Indigenous families and domestic/family violence

The latest material added to the Australian Institute of Family Studies library database is displayed, up to a maximum of 30 items. Where available online, a link to the document is provided. Many items can be borrowed from the Institute's library via the Interlibrary loan system.

See more resources on Indigenous families and domestic/family violence in the AIFS library catalogue

'Every client has a trauma history': teaching respectful relationships to marginalised youth - an evaluation of NAPCAN's Respectful Relationships Program Northern Territory 2017-2018

Dobia B
Penrith, NSW : Western Sydney University, 2019.
NAPCAN has developed a trauma-informed respectful relationships education program in the Northern Territory for young people experiencing complex challenges. The program aimed to address a gap in the field of prevention education: young people with complex challenges are at high risk of abuse and yet have least access to educational experiences that can teach them to navigate relationships more effectively. The program provides training and resources to practitioners in the youth services sector and is adapted from its Love Bites school-based program to provide a more flexible-approach in informal settings. This report describes the development of the program and the evaluation findings. Drawing on consultations with practitioners from a variety of services, the development project investigated the specific needs of the youth sector, evaluated the perceived effectiveness of the program, assessed the program against current research literature, and reviewed the extent to which the program met the social and cultural needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community organisations. The report concludes with recommendations for further development.

Unintended consequences of domestic violence law : gendered aspirations and racialised realities.

Nancarrow H
Cham, Switzerland : Palgrave Macmillan, 2019.
This book looks into two major issues for domestic violence in Australia: law and justice responses and the over-representation of Indigenous Australians. It reviews the issues and how they relate and calls for a paradigm shift across the whole system in how it responds to men's violence against women: from interventions with perpetrators to police responses to counselling for victims. Chapters include: the problem in context; conceptualising domestic violence; gendered aspirations in domestic violence law ; sex and race differences in law's application; explanations of Indigenous violence and recidivism; reconceptualising typologies of violence; and gendered and racialised power and the law.

The First Response project: trauma and culturally informed approaches to primary health care for women who experience violence : summary report

Lowitja Institute, George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales
Carlton South, Vic : Lowitja Institute, 2019.
This paper highlights learnings from the First Response project, a study into how the workforce within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations conceptualise trauma and culturally informed care and how this informs approaches to primary health care for women who are experiencing violence. The study involved interviews with 24 clinical and management staff about their experiences and insight into trauma informed care and the resources that would support their work, which was followed by a knowledge translation workshop to explore some of these issues further. Themes include: supporting holistic client trajectories; staff investment in their work and their service; the importance of clinical supervision and self-care to prevent burnout and vicarious trauma; and the importance of maintaining boundaries, especially in small communities.

The missing link - housing and Indigenous domestic and family violence

Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute
Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2019.
Written for practitioners and policymakers, this paper summarises some of the findings from a recent study into the housing needs of Indigenous women and children facing domestic and family violence. It discusses the complexities of leaving home, the limited availability of emergency housing options, difficulties in accessing and sustaining long-term housing, responses and housing options for offenders, and increased risk of child removal. It advises that developing culturally appropriate responses to Indigenous domestic and family violence and improving integration between housing and domestic and family violence and child protection services should reduce rates of Indigenous women's injury and death, as well as rates of Indigenous children's out-of-home care. The full findings are published in the report 'Improving housing and service responses to domestic and family violence for Indigenous individuals and families'.

Improving housing and service responses to domestic and family violence for Indigenous individuals and families

Cripps K and Habibis D
Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2019.
Indigenous women and children have very limited housing pathways to choose from in the aftermath of domestic and family violence, and they often become trapped in a revolving door between crisis services, homelessness, and returning to an unsafe home. This report investigates the housing needs of Indigenous women and children facing domestic and family violence and considers the policy development options. It advises that developing culturally appropriate responses to Indigenous domestic and family violence and improving integration between housing and domestic and family violence and child protection services should reduce rates of Indigenous women's injury and death, as well as rates of Indigenous children's out-of-home care. This study drew on an evidence and policy review, interviews with 9 Indigenous women who had experienced domestic and family violence, and interviews with 30 policy and service delivery stakeholders from the housing, domestic violence, legal and health sectors, conducted in two regional cities in New South Wales and the Northern Territory.

Fourth Action Plan - National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022

Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, Commonwealth of Australia, 2019.
This document is the fourth and final action plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022. The National Plan is a 12 year cross-government plan to ensure that women and their children are safe and free from violence now and in the future, and is supported by a series of 3-year Action Plans. These Action Plans identify actions, responsibilities and timeframes, allowing governments to work together to develop, implement, and report on progress within a coordinated national framework. This fourth action plan, for 2019-2022, reflects on what has been achieved so far and sets out an agenda featuring eight principles and twenty practical actions across five priority areas. These priority areas are: Primary prevention is key; Support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children; Respect, listen and respond to the diverse lived experience and knowledge of women and their children affected by violence; Respond to sexual violence and sexual harassment; and Improve support and service system responses.

Evaluation of the Integrated Domestic and Family Violence Service Program: final report

Zmudzki F, Breckenridge J, Newton B, Delaney M and Valentine K
Sydney, NSW : Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW Sydney, 2019.
This report presents the findings and recommendations of an evaluation of the Integrated Domestic and Family Violence Service program (IDFVS) in New South Wales. The program provides a multi-agency, integrated and coordinated response to domestic and family violence among high-risk target groups and in targeted communities. Following identification of domestic violence by such agencies as child protection or the police, the IDFVS program then intervenes to provide ongoing practical and emotional support to adult and child victims, whether they leave or remain living with the perpetrator, and, in some sites, interventions to perpetrators. In particular, the program aims to target Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people, people from non-English speaking backgrounds, and socio-economic disadvantaged people. The State Government commissioned this evaluation to assess the value and critical elements for success of the integrated approach, explore client needs and outcomes, identify gaps in service provision and integration, evaluate cost-effectiveness, and make recommendations on ongoing implementation and program improvement. The evaluation draws on administrative data from 2015-16 and 2016-17 as well as interviews and focus groups.

National Social Housing Survey 2018: key results

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2019.
This report provides key findings from the 2018 National Social Housing Survey, a survey of tenants in public housing, community housing and state owned and managed Indigenous housing in Australia. Tenants were asked about overall satisfaction, satisfaction with amenities, location, and maintenance services, and the benefits of living in social housing. In 2018, three quarters of tenants were satisfied with the social housing services, similar to findings of the last survey in 2016.

The best opportunities in life: background document - Northern Territory Child and Adolescent Health and Wellbeing Strategic Plan 2018-2028

Northern Territory. Dept. of Health
Darwin, N.T. : Dept. of Health, 2018.
This document sets out some of the evidence used to develop the 'Northern Territory Child and Adolescent Health and Wellbeing Strategic Plan 2018-2028'. It includes: statistics on children, adolescents and young people; a summary analysis of consultations with children and youth; a table detailing the input received from partner organisations; examples of programs that work that are evidence based and consistent with the plan's principles, particularly those around place based design and local involvement or co-design; a detailed timeline on implementation and monitoring; a potential Monitoring Report using a KPI traffic light matrix; and a discussion on data governance and data sovereignty - the key to Aboriginal data sharing.

National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children: Fourth Action Plan (2019-22) : consultation summary report

Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, 2018
Consultations have just been held to help inform the development of the fourth and final Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. This report summarises the learnings from these consultations, including the observations, insights and priorities expressed by workshop participants. The consultations were held with service providers from over 600 government and non-government organisations across Australia. The findings are summarised under the following key themes: invest in primary prevention and early intervention to stop violence at its source; make reducing violence everyone's business; listen to lived experience and respect cultural knowledge; acknowledge and better respond to the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children; respond better to sexual violence, as a form of domestic and family violence and as a separate crime; improve systems so women and children are safe; change the behaviour of people who choose to use violence; respect the needs of children and young people as individuals; and learn from what's working, be flexible and tailor approaches. The findings are also discussed in more detail in separate documents for each of the consultation sites and for interest groups including services working with men who use violence, women with disability, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

Victorian Aboriginal men's programs: literature review

No to Violence Male Family Violence Family Prevention Association
Melbourne, Vic. : No to Violence, 2018
This discusses the role of social and emotional wellbeing in helping to address family violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and how it can inform Aboriginal men's behaviour change programs. It also describes several Aboriginal family violence programs and activities currently operating in Victoria and considers issues in impact evaluation, noting evaluation studies from across Australia on programs that have an emphasis on healing and behavioural change. There has been an increase over recent years in activities undertaken in Aboriginal communities with men to address harmful behaviours that lead to family violence, and these promising interventions require ongoing support from governments and mainstream organisations.

An evaluation of the Family Advocacy and Support Services: final report

Inside Policy (Firm), Australia. Attorney-General's Dept.
Canberra, A.C.T. : Attorney-General's Dept., 2018.
Family Advocacy and Support Services (FASS) are a government initiative to help families in the family law system who are experiencing family violence. FASS aim to assess risk and prepare safety plans, deliver holistic services to victims and perpetrators of family violence, provide continuity of service between the State and Federal systems, and provide better support for peoples from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse communities, with services provided by a duty lawyer. Legal aid commissions were funded to establish and implement the FASS in 23 service locations nationwide from 2016. This independent evaluation was commissioned to assess the outputs and short-term outcomes of FASS, including the impact on self-represented parties, information sharing, and the impacts of connecting family law clients to social services for families, the courts, and service providers. This report presents the findings and discusses the implications and opportunities for improvement. The evaluation found strong integration of duty lawyer and social support services and increased understanding among families of court processes, support services, and safety strategies.

Maranguka justice reinvestment project: impact assessment

KPMG (Australia), Just Reinvest NSW Inc.
N.S.W. : Just Reinvest NSW, 2018.
The Maranguka Justice Reinvestment project was developed in response to the number of Aboriginal families experiencing high levels of social disadvantage and rising crime in the small remote town of Bourke in New South Wales. This place-based, Aboriginal-led model redirects funds away from crisis responses and prison and detention and instead towards preventative, diversionary, and community development initiatives that address the underlying causes of crime. This report assesses the project's impact after 5 years, now that local initiatives and processes have had time to embed and develop. It reviews progress towards building leadership, collaboration, new program design, and procedural change, as well as changes from 2016 to 2017 in rates of domestic violence, school attendance and completion, bail breaches, juvenile charges, time in custody, and obtaining drivers licences. The report highlights the financial and social cost savings of the justice reinvestment approach.

Report on consultations with socially excluded children and young people

New South Wales. Office of the Advocate for Children and Young People
Strawberry Hills, NSW : NSW Advocate for Children and Young People, 2018.
In this report, the New South Wales Advocate for Children and Young People presents 70 recommendations to improve policy and practice relating to children's welfare and wellbeing. The key and overarching recommendation is the need to systematise children and young people's voices into decision-making processes at all levels on matters affecting their lives: from the highest level of government policy making to the day to day decisions made by the service they connect with. The recommendations are based on consultations with almost 3,000 socially excluded children and young people from across New South Wales, defined here as those living in low socio-economic status areas, in out of home care, experiencing homelessness, in the juvenile justice system, or from Indigenous communities. Participants were asked about what and isn't working well, what makes them feel welcome or unwelcome, how to stop violence, support to prevent entry to the juvenile justice system, and key priorities. The recommendations and consultation findings are discussed under the themes of participation and voice, education, employment, homelessness and housing, violence, transport, mental health and substance abuse, supportive workers and services, accessible programs and activities, justice, and the built environment.

National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022: Fourth Action Plan (2019-22) : background and evidence summary - draft

Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, 2018.
The National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022 is a 12 year cross-government plan to ensure that women and their children are safe and free from violence now and in the future. A series of 3-year Action Plans support each phase of the plan. Consultations are now underway to inform the development of the fourth and final Action Plan, which will cover the 2019-2022 period. This document provides an overview of the evidence base behind the priority action areas that are being reviewed within the consultations. It discusses findings from the Personal Safety Survey (PSS) and the National Community Attitudes towards Violence Against Women Survey (NCAS), reducing violence against women and their children through prevention activities, reducing sexual violence, addressing the impact of violence on women from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and culturally and linguistically diverse communities, addressing the impact of violence on women with disability, developing workforce capability, responding to the impact of family and domestic violence on children, adequate crisis accommodation, supporting the medium to long-term safety and wellbeing of women and their children, LGBTIQ women, addressing technology-facilitated abuse, access to justice, National Risk Assessment Principles, and Safety First Principles.

The Justice Project: final report

Law Council of Australia
Braddon, A.C.T. : Law Council of Australia, 2018.
The Justice Project is a comprehensive national review into the state of access to justice in Australia, conducted by the Law Council of Australia. It will focus on the barriers facing those with significant social and economic disadvantage, as well as identifying what is working to reduce those barriers. Particular at-risk groups include: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; people with disabilities; the elderly; economically disadvantaged and impoverished people; homeless persons; children; prisoners and detainees; people who are trafficked or exploited; people facing challenges concerning sexual orientation or gender identity; recent arrivals to Australia; asylum seekers; people experiencing family violence; and people residing or working in regional and remote areas. This is the final report of the project, and follows on from extensive consultations and a comprehensive literature review. The final report comprises of 22 chapters and 59 recommendations.

VLA client and service data analysis

Analytics for Change (Firm), Victoria Legal Aid
Melbourne, Vic. : Victoria Legal Aid, 2018.
Victoria Legal Aid provides free legal information and education across the state, with a focus on prevention and early resolution of legal problems. It also provides more intensive legal services such as legal advice and representation to select groups. This report investigates trends in levels service delivery to priority groups by analysing client data from July 2006 to June 2016. It compares all clients, Aboriginal and Torres Strait clients, clients who spoke a language other than English at home, and young clients aged 10-17 years old. Information is included on nature of legal issue, area of law (criminal, civil, or family law), service provided, and information about the client: age and gender, disability status, employment and income source, living arrangements and dependents, location, and country of origin. 'High-cost' clients are also compared. Of the top 10 matter types for all clients, a significant number of clients were involved in matters relating to both the Family Violence Protection Act and spending time with their children: a significant number of clients involved in matters relating to the Family Violence Protection Act had also dealt with a matter of assault or theft.

Australia's health 2018: the fifteenth biennial health report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2018.
The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare provides a biennial report to Parliament on the health of the Australian population and the state of the health system. This 2018 report combines analytical feature articles on topical health issues with short statistical snapshots in the following areas: Australia's health system; Causes of ill health; Determinants of health; Health of population groups; Indigenous health; and Prevention, treatment and health services.

Inclusivity in interagency responses to domestic violence and child protection.

Tsantefski M, Wilde T, Young A and O'Leary P
Australian Social Work v. 71 no. 2 2018: 202-214
The Gold Coast Domestic Violence Integrated Response (GCDVIR) in Queensland involves over 15 agencies, including child protection, domestic violence, and justice. It aims to support the safety and wellbeing of women and children living with and separated from domestic and family violence. This article explores its work with clients from minority backgrounds and whether the values and goals of the underlying model are permeating through all of the agencies. It draws on interviews with 30 professionals from a range of agencies involved with GCDVIR, who describe their work with Indigenous, culturally and linguistically diverse, and LGBTIQ community people. The findings reveal high awareness and a desire for inclusion, but also service challenges and a lack of knowledge.

Kurruna Mwarre Ingkintja - Good Spirit Men's Place: research project report - 'Wurra apa artwuka pmara - Boy's and Male's Place'

Lechleitner K, Nathan P, Silver B and Rosewarne C
Kew, Vic. : CASSE, 2018
Many reports have highlighted the need for an Aboriginal men's place to help provide support for men's healing from traumatic experiences and empowerment within communities. The Kurruna Mwarre Ingkintja 'Good Spirit Men's Place' project was commissioned to develop and evaluate a model of best practice for Men's Sheds in Alice Springs in Central Australia. This paper describes the project, including the rationale and background literature, the participatory action research process, the needs and views of local men, the establishment of a Male Leadership Group, the identification of domestic violence as a key issue for local men, and the development of the intervention 'Breakthrough Violence Changing Minds and Saving Lives: A Brief Group Program for the Treatment of Violence'.

Young parents and their children.

National Children's Commissioner (Australia)
Children's rights report 2017. Sydney, NSW : Australian Human Rights Commission, 2018: 84-179
In 2017, the National Children's Commissioner reviewed the special issue of the rights and needs of young parents and their children, with a view to identifying the critical supports needed to improve their personal, educational and economic outcomes. This chapter presents the findings and recommendations of this study. It highlights young parenthood as a human rights issue, and presents insights from the Australian research literature and data, submissions from agencies and experts, and consultations with young parents. Topics include: Locality and demographics of young parents in Australia; Young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents; Young parents in the justice system; Health outcomes for teenage parents and their babies; Welfare dependence and long term socio-economic disadvantage; Relationship status of teenage mothers; Education and employment; Housing insecurity; Access to health care, sexual health and abortion services; Domestic and partner violence and teenage pregnancy; Pathways to parenthood; Mortality trends; Premature births and low birth weight; Concerns raised with Kids Helpline about teenage pregnancy and parenthood; Income support payment data; National education data; Risk factors of young parenthood; Stigma, prejudice and discrimination; Child protection and family and domestic violence; Access to early childhood education and care services; Health, sexual health and contraception education; Transport and driver's licences; Education, employment and economic security; Cultural safety; Young fathers; Service disconnection; Responsiveness of services; and Goals and aspirations. Examples are included of interventions and programs. Overall, the realisation of young parents' and their children's rights requires an integrated approach across a range of government initiatives, and the Commissioner recommends that the Minister for Social Services take a lead role in advancing a coordinated cross-portfolio policy approach.

Innovative models in addressing violence against Indigenous women: final report

Blagg H, Williams E, Cummings E, Hovane V, Torres M and Woodley K
Sydney : ANROWS, 2018.
This paper looks at innovative models to reduce family violence in remote Indigenous communities in Australia. It draws on a qualitative study of three Indigenous organisations: Marninwarntikura Women's Resource Centre, in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia; Darwin Aboriginal and Islander Women's Shelter, in the Northern Territory; and Barambah Child Care Agency, Cherbourg, Queensland. It discusses place-based responses, the inclusion of men, court systems and justice, national policies and mainstream services, police and coercive control, trauma-informed responses, and intersectionality. The paper calls for a paradigm shift that moves attention away from a simple criminal justice model towards collective processes of community healing grounded in Indigenous knowledge.

Innovative models in addressing violence against Indigenous women: key findings and future directions

Blagg H, Williams E, Cummings E, Hovane V, Torres M and Woodley K
Sydney : ANROWS, 2018.
This paper highlights key findings and policy implications from a recent study into innovative responses to sexual, family, and 'lateral' community violence against Indigenous women in Australia. The study reviewed the national and international literature and gathered learnings from three Indigenous organisations: Marninwarntikura Women's Resource Centre, in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia; Darwin Aboriginal and Islander Women's Shelter, in the Northern Territory; and Barambah Child Care Agency, Cherbourg, Queensland. Overall, there is a degree of incommensurability between mainstream understandings of causes and effective responses to family violence, and the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Although Indigenous women's work on preventing and responding to family violence is under-represented in the literature, there are numerous examples of their ingenuity in addressing the complexities of violence at the intersections of multiple sites of oppression.

Review of the Cashless Debit Card Trial in Ceduna and East Kimberley

Centre for Excellence in Child and Family Welfare
Melbourne, Vic. : Centre for Excellence in Child and Family Welfare, 2017.
This report reviews the findings of an interim report into the Cashless Debit Card Trial evaluation. A 12-month trial of the Australian Government's Cashless Debit Card initiative is currently underway in Ceduna, in South Australia, and Kununurra and Wyndham in the East Kimberley region of Western Australia, which aims to reduce the harm caused by alcohol and drug abuse and gambling among welfare recipients by reducing the cash available to spend on these products. The interim evaluation report, by Orima Research, presented findings for the first 6-months of the trial and overall found that the intervention was having a positive impact so far. This review by the Centre for Excellence in Child and Family Welfare describes the findings then raises concerns about Orima Research's conclusions, selective use of data, and methodological issues with the study. It finds that the interim evaluation made some very strong conclusions that were used to justify the extension and expansion of the program, and that these conclusions do not appear to reflect the mixed results of the data.

Alice Springs Integrated Response to Family and Domestic Violence project: final evaluation report

Putt J, Holder R and Shaw G
Casuarina, NT : Territory Families, Northern Territory Government, 2017.
This report presents an evaluation of the Alice Springs Integrated Response to Family and Domestic Violence, a joint Territory-Commonwealth Government initiative to increase the safety of women and children and improve accountability and behaviour change in men who use family and domestic violence. The project is based in the remote regional hub of Alice Springs, in the Northern Territory, and involves a risk assessment and referral protocol, victim support and advocacy, a men's behaviour change program, respectful relationships education for young people, and community engagement, with a particular focus on Indigenous people. The evaluation examines the impact, effectiveness, and integration of the project as a whole, with a specific focus on three of the components: the Family Safety Framework (FSF) for women and children assessed as being at imminent risk of serious injury or death, the Victim Support and Advocacy Service (VSAS) for people attending the Alice Springs Court of Summary Jurisdiction, and the Men's Behaviour Change Program (MBCP). The report concludes with recommendations for further developing the project.

Towards an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence prevention framework for men and boys

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation, White Ribbon Foundation (Australia)
Kingston, A.C.T. : Healing Foundation, 2017.
This paper identifies the essential principles required for an effective family and domestic violence prevention framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and boys. The paper is produced by The Healing Foundation and White Ribbon Australia and informed by a knowledge circle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence prevention experts. It considers the socio-political context in which violence occurs, identifies critical elements to guide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence prevention, and provides good practice approaches and case studies. One key aspect is a focus on collective wellbeing - that violence should be understood within a historical context that recognises the continued impact of foundational and structural violence, emotional trauma, and intergenerational trauma on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and boys.

Specialist homelessness services annual report 2016-17

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2017.
This web resource describes the services and clients of specialist homelessness services provided by the government in Australia in 2016/17. Data from the Specialist Homelessness Services Collection. Sections include: Policy framework for reducing homelessness and service response; Clients, services and outcomes; Clients in regional and remote areas; Unmet demand for specialist homelessness services; Client groups of interest; Indigenous clients; Clients experiencing domestic and family violence; Clients with disability; Young people presenting alone; Older clients; Clients with a current mental health issue; Clients leaving care; Clients exiting custodial arrangements; and Children on care and protection orders. Client numbers increased 3% from the previous year to over 288,000.

Seeking help for domestic violence: exploring regional, rural, and remote women's coping experiences : final report

Wendt S, Chung D, Elder A, Hendrick A and Hartwig A
N.S.W. : ANROWS, 2017.
This report presents the results of a qualitative study examining the experiences of women seeking help for domestic and family violence who live in regional, rural, and remote areas in Australia. The study contributes to the limited evidence on how geographical and social isolation shapes women's coping with and decisions to seek assistance for domestic and family violence, and their efforts to live safely. Case studies were conducted in five locations - Whyalla, Riverland, Mount Gambier, and Murray Bridge in South Australia and Derby in Western Australia - and involved interviews with clients, managers, and practitioners from specialist domestic and family violence. Of the 23 clients participating, 6 identified as Aboriginal. The findings provide insights into women's experience of abuse and the coping strategies they employ, and highlight the effectiveness of the hub-and-spoke model of service delivery for assisting women living in isolated places and across large distances.

Seeking help for domestic violence: exploring regional, rural, and remote women's coping experiences : key findings and future directions

Wendt S, Chung D, Elder A, Hendrick A and Hartwig A
N.S.W. : ANROWS, 2017.
This paper presents key findings for policy and practice from a 2015 qualitative case study on the prevalence of domestic and family violence and sexual assault in rural Australia, and issues of service provision for women. The study - undertaken in 5 sites in South Australia and Western Australia - examined the extent of this violence in rural and remote areas and the impact of social and geographical isolation on the ability of women to disclose, report, seek help, and receive appropriate interventions.

Cashless Debit Card Trial evaluation: final evaluation report

Orima Research, Australia. Dept. of Human Services, Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Human Services, 2017.
The Australian Government's Cashless Debit Card initiative aims to reduce the harm caused by alcohol and drug abuse and gambling by reducing the cash available in a community to pay for these products. A 12-month trial of the initiative commenced in early 2016 in Ceduna, in South Australia, and Kununurra and Wyndham in the East Kimberley region of Western Australia. Participants will receive 80 per cent of their welfare payments into a mainstream debit card account that cannot be used to purchase alcohol and gambling products, or withdrawn as cash. This report presents final findings of the trial, and is the third of three planned evaluation reports. It assesses the impact of the intervention on: program participants and their families; the consumption of alcohol, illegal drug use, or gambling; crime, violence and harm related to these behaviours; perceptions of safety; and other positive impacts. Unintended adverse consequences and circumvention behaviours, and the lessons for future program delivery, are also considered.
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