National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children

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Supporting families, communities and organisations to keep children safe: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 : fourth action plan 2018-2020.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra : Dept. of Social Services, 2019
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children was endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments in April 2009. Action plans are produced every three years under this Framework, setting out the strategic focus for the next few years and how all governments, the non-government sector, and the broader community will implement and measure progress towards these goals. This is the fourth and final action plan, for the 2018-2020 period. The first three action plans delivered some key achievements, including the appointment of the National Children's Commissioner and the development of national standards for out-of-home care. The fourth action plan builds on these foundations and focuses on place-based initiatives, improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, improving permanency outcomes, and implementing the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations. This document sets out the priority areas and how they will be implemented.

National statement of principles for child safe organisations: consultation draft

Australian Human Rights Commission
Sydney, NSW : Australian Human Rights Commission, 2017.
The Australian Human Rights Commission has been commissioned by the Government to develop a National Statement of Principles for Child Safe Organisations. This document presents a draft statement, in the format of a finalised statement with endorsement by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG). The Commission invites feedback from the sector, to help finalise this significant work. The document sets out 10 principles to promote child wellbeing and prevent harm to children and young people.

Taking stock & moving ahead: a report on consultative forums on the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020

Families Australia (Organization)
Barton, ACT : Families Australia, 2017.
Families Australia recently held ten forums around Australia to promote understanding about the 'National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' and to seek views on ways to further improve child safety and wellbeing in Australia. The forums involved 404 participants from government, non-government and research sectors and focused on two questions: 'As a nation, what more must we do to improve child safety and wellbeing?' and 'How can we get the Australian community at large to prioritise the safety and wellbeing of children?' This report describes the findings and themes of the forum, including ways to improve current systems, new areas of emphasis, and addressing root causes of abuse and neglect and valuing children.

2013-14 annual report: protecting children is everyone's business - National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, 2016
'Protecting Children is Everyone's Business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' is the first long-term national approach to protect the safety and wellbeing of Australia's children, emphasising early intervention and prevention. The National Framework is supported by three-year action plans that identify specific actions, responsibilities and timeframes for implementation. This annual report reviews achievements from the second year of the Second Action Plan 2012-2015. It provides background information on the plan and reviews progress against 6 key outcomes: Children live in safe and supportive families and communities; Children and families access adequate support to promote safety and intervene early; Risk factors for child abuse and neglect are addressed; Children who have been abused or neglected receive the support and care they need for their safety and wellbeing; Indigenous children are supported and safe in their families and communities; and Child sexual abuse and exploitation is prevented and survivors receive adequate support. Note, this annual report series will now take a more streamlined and cost effective approach, and is formatted differently to previous editions.

What road ahead? Directions and challenges for the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020.

Babingtob B
Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal no. 44 Apr 2016: 4-15
This article provides an overview of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020, and highlights challenges for its Third Action Plan.

Measuring progress under the National Framework: evaluation of progress under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children

ACIL Allen Consulting, Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, 2015
This report evaluates the implementation and progress of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. The National Framework is a Council of Australian Governments (COAG) long-term approach to ensuring the safety and wellbeing of children in Australia. The evaluation looks at the barriers, strengths and opportunities arising from the National Framework's tripartite approach to implementation and governance and investigated whether the National Framework has added value to processes and systems aimed at protecting children and has shifted focus from statutory protection to prevention and early intervention approaches. The evaluation also establishes a baseline for subsequent evaluations on the extent to which the National Framework is achieving its high level outcomes over the long term. This evaluation was conducted from late 2014 to April 2015, and the findings were used in the development of the National Framework's Third Action Plan.

Driving change - intervening early: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 : third three-year action plan, 2015-2018.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Social Services
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, 2015.
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children was endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments in April 2009. Action plans are produced every three years under this Framework, setting out the strategic focus for the next few years and how all governments, the non-government sector, and the broader community will implement and measure progress towards these goals. This is the third action plan, for the 2015-2018 period. It is influenced by the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022 and recent inquiries including the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, and has a strong focus on interventions in early childhood, supporting young people leaving care, and improving organisational responses.

Developing the Third Action Plan (2015-2018) 'Driving change - engaging the community' [electronic text] : a discussion paper.

Australia. Dept. of Social Services, Coalition of Organisations Committed to the Safety and Wellbeing of Australia's Children
Canberra, A.C.T. : Coalition of Organisations Committed to the Safety and Wellbeing of Australia's Children, c2015.
Consultations are now open for the development of the Third Action Plan for the 'National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020'. A series of national roundtables will be held to reflect upon achievements to date and to explore ideas for the for the next 3 years of the plan: 2015-2018. This discussion paper provides a starting point for conversations with key stakeholders, and covers: the consultation process; the background of the National Framework and the first two action plans; challenges and achievements to date; and questions for discussion.

Annual report to the Council of Australian Governments 2012-13: Protecting children is everyone's business - National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2014
'Protecting Children is Everyone's Business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' is the first long-term national approach to protect the safety and wellbeing of Australia's children, emphasising early intervention and prevention. The National Framework is supported by three-year action plans that identify specific actions, responsibilities and timeframes for implementation. This annual report reviews achievements from the first year of the Second Action Plan 2012-2015. It provides background information on the plan and reviews progress against 6 key outcomes: Children live in safe and supportive families and communities; Children and families access adequate support to promote safety and intervene early; Risk factors for child abuse and neglect are addressed; Children who have been abused or neglected receive the support and care they need for their safety and wellbeing; Indigenous children are supported and safe in their families and communities; and Child sexual abuse and exploitation is prevented and survivors receive adequate support.

Advancing the visibility of the child in adult and child and family services.

McDougall S and Gibson C
Communities, Children and Families Australia v. 8 no. 1 Jul 2014: 21-35
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children promotes the view that to better serve Australia's children all services, communities and individuals need to work together: 'Protecting Children is Everyone's Business'. The Australian Centre for Child Protection conducted a major workforce development initiative, 'Protecting and Nurturing Children: Building Capacity, Building Bridges', to enhance the capacity of practitioners from a diverse range of services, both child- and family- and adult-focused, to work purposefully with the parents of vulnerable children to prevent child abuse and neglect. This initiative also aimed to build effective connections and support collaboration between adult-focused and child- and family-focused services at both local and strategic levels. By reflecting on the learnings gained from the 'Building Capacity, Building Bridges' initiative, this paper discusses why such an initiative is necessary and identifies some the barriers to achieving the changes called for by the Framework.

The good practice guide to Child Aware Approaches: keeping children safe and well

Hunter C and Price-Robertson R
Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2014.
The Child Aware Approaches initiative was introduced under the 'Second Action Plan 2012-15' of the 'National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020'. The initiative aims to develop community-led, innovative and practical, grassroots actions to keep children safe and well. This resource document explains the core philosophies and key principles of this initiative and provides guidance on how the principles can be applied in practice. This resource is intended for service managers and practitioners working with vulnerable children and families in social services.

Reshaping our protective systems : issues and options.

Lonne B
Communities, Children and Families Australia v. 7 no. 1 Dec 2013: 9-20
Australia's systems for protecting children from child abuse and neglect are undergoing reform in light of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children and innumerable judicial and other inquiries into their operations and outcomes. This article examines the current context for child protection practice and critically examines the dominant policy and practice frameworks, highlighting issues confronting policy makers and practitioners. Within the current systemic reform agendas, it is posited, there are key priorities that must be attended to in order to bring about necessary change, workforce support and a renewed emphasis on quality professional practice and re-orientation of practice approaches. Also required is the embedding of ethics into a relationship-based practice framework, and revitalising localised community involvement in a protective web of care that provides practical, compassionate and accessible help to needy and vulnerable children and families.

National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 [electronic text] : technical paper on operational definitions and data issues for key national indicators

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013.
"This technical paper specifies the operational definitions and primary data sources for the key national indicators under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. It outlines the best currently available data sources for the key national indicators that the AIHW has identified, in conjunction with the National Framework Implementation Working Group. It comments on data gaps and limitations, particularly inconsistencies between indicator (ideal) definitions and existing data definitions."--Back cover.

Protecting children is everyone's business - National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020: annual report to the Council of Australian Governments 2011-12.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2013
'Protecting Children is Everyone's Business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' is the first long-term national approach to protect the safety and wellbeing of Australia's children, emphasising early intervention and prevention. The National Framework is supported by three-year action plans that identify specific actions, responsibilities and timeframes for implementation. This annual report reviews the third year of operation of the National Framework, from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, and describes progress on each of the priority indicators and supporting outcomes. These address issues of child protection, child abuse prevention, out of home care, research and evidence gaps, service delivery, and Indigenous families.

Scoping reportable measures for the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 [electronic text] : supporting outcome 1.

Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2013.
"This working paper provides an overview of the work that AIHW completed for the Standing Council on Community and Disability Services Advisory Council (SCCDSAC) funded project Scoping the development of reportable measures to support the 'National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' supporting outcome 1: 'Children live in safe and supportive families and communities'."

Protecting children is everyone's business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children : second three-year action plan 2012-2015.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2012
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children was endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments in April 2009. The first three-year action plan - for the 2009-2012 period - outlined how all governments, the non-government sector, and the broader community will implement national priority goals under the Framework, and measure progress towards these goals. This second action plan is for the period 2012-2015. It outlines the priorities of this reporting period, which will focus on working together across governments and non-government sectors and the development of local partnerships for local solutions.

Protecting children is everyone's business - National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020: annual report to the Council of Australian Governments 2010-11.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2012.
'Protecting Children is Everyone's Business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' is the first long-term national approach to protect the safety and wellbeing of Australia's children, emphasising early intervention and prevention. The National Framework is supported by three-year action plans that identify specific actions, responsibilities and timeframes for implementation. This second annual report reviews the second year of operation of the National Framework, from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011, and describes progress on each of the priority indicators and supporting outcomes. These address issues of child protection, child abuse prevention, out of home care, research and evidence gaps, service delivery, and Indigenous families.

Challenges ahead for history making framework.

Orr B
Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal no. 28 Autumn 2011: 4-7
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 was established in April 2009. This article reflects on the introduction of the Framework, its first two years of operation, and considerations for the future.

National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children : perspectives on progress and challenges.

Babington B
Family Matters no. 89 2011: 11-20
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 aims to make a substantial and sustained reduction in child abuse and neglect, implemented through a series of three-year action plans to 2020. This article discusses the origins and key aspects of the National Framework, offers perspectives on achievements to date, and suggests elements for inclusion in the forthcoming second three-year action plan, covering the period from 2012 to 2015. The first two years of the National Framework has been an important scene-setting period, marked by growth in political and NGO support and by a useful consolidation of knowledge in areas such as supports for carers and the needs of young people transitioning from the out-of-home care system. There has also been fostering of innovative practice, especially in the area of early identification of family and child needs. Much remains to be done, however, to complete successfully the first three-year action plan. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on early intervention and prevention efforts, as well as on specific areas, including disability and responding to child sexual abuse.

Protecting children : evolving systems.

Higgins D
Family Matters no. 89 2011: 5-10
This article reviews the state of the child protection system in Australia. It discusses the rate of child protection notifications, the fragmented nature of state/territory based systems, the effects of abuse and trauma on children and young people, and the development, achievements, and gaps of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. This article also serves as a thematic editorial to this journal issue, noting the contribution of the other articles in this issue.

National Research Agenda for Protecting Children, 2011-2014: filling the research gaps : a priority project under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020

Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. National Framework Implementation Working Group
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2011.
One of the priority actions under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020 is the development of a national research agenda for protecting children. This agenda identifies research priorities and gaps in the evidence, to better inform policy development and research design. This document introduces the agenda and details five priority areas for research: prevention; protection and therapeutic responses; care; systems; and maltreatment types.

An outline of National Standards for out-of-home care

Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. National Framework Implementation Working Group
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2010.
The National Standards for out-of-home care have been designed to deliver consistency and drive improvements in the quality of care provided to children and young people. The 13 National Standards focus on the key factors that directly influence better outcomes for those living in out-of-home care. The National Standards are an initiative of all governments - the Australian Government and state and territory governments - and is one of 12 priority projects as part of the 'National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020'. The report introduces each of the new standards, and discusses their overarching principles, measurement, and reporting.

Protecting children is everyone's business - National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020: annual report to the Council of Australian Governments 2009-10.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, ACT : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2010.
'Protecting Children is Everyone's Business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020' is the first long-term national approach to protect the safety and wellbeing of Australia's children, emphasising early intervention and prevention. The National Framework is supported by three-year action plans that identify specific actions, responsibilities and timeframes for implementation. This annual report reviews the first year of operation of the National Framework, from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010, and describes progress on each of the priority indicators and supporting outcomes. These address issues of child protection, child abuse prevention, out of home care, research and evidence gaps, service delivery, and Indigenous families.

Can a national approach really make a difference?

Schrapel S
Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal no. 25 Autumn/Winter 2010: 4-7
One year ago, the Council of Australian Governments reached agreement on the establishment of a 12-year National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children. This article discusses the contribution of the framework to child protection work and the way governments and communities can engage around public policy.

National standards for out of home care: final report

KPMG (Australia), Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2010
The development of National Standards for Out of Home Care is a key action under the 'National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020'. It is widely reported that children and young people who have been placed in out of home care have poorer life outcomes than children and young people not living in care, and the new standards would seek to drive improvements in the quality of care to ensure that children and young people living in care have the same opportunities to reach their potential in all areas of well-being. This report presents the proposed new standards, and includes background material on the consultation process, issues in out of home care, children's developmental need, principles and rationale, and implementation issues. The standards have been developed by KPMG at the behest of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Transitioning from out of home care to independence: a national priority under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020

Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. National Framework Implementation Working Group
Canberra : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2010.
One key aspect of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children is to improve young people's transition from out of home care in Australia. This discussion paper introduces the issues and sets out a vision for the future. Two key issues which will be progressed through the 'Transitioning to Independence National Priority' are: having a nationally consistent approach to leaving care plans, and reviewing the Transition to Independent Living Allowance (TILA). Sections inc this paper include: vision; definition of the problem; profile of young care leavers; cost-benefit analysis of current and alternative pathways; the systems approach; and the Transitioning to Independence Process. Several extracts and diagrams from reports are included as appendices: 'Pathways from out-of-home care', Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (2010); 'Transition from care: avoidable costs to government of alternative pathways of young people exiting the formal child protection care system in Australia', Morgan Disney & Associates (2006); and 'Young people leaving care and protection: a report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme', Maunders et al. (1999).

Protecting children is everyone's business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children : implementing the first three year action plan 2009-2012.

Council of Australian Governments, Australia. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, c2009.
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children was endorsed by the Council of Australian Governments in April 2009. This Implementation Plan for 2009-2012 outlines how all governments, the non-government sector and the broader community will implement the goals listed in the National Framework's first three-year action plan, and how the progress of these actions will be measured. The action plan contains more than 70 actions, categorised as national priorities, major reforms, ongoing initiatives for children and families, and community initiatives. This implementation report focuses on the national priorities, which include joining up service delivery, closing the gap for Indigenous children, developing national standards for out of home care, supporting carers, supporting the transition to independence, and filling the research gaps.

Because children and families matter: delivering on the national reform agenda

Helyar S, Woodruff J, Bevan K, Adamson E, Skattebol J, Valentine K, Brennan D and Katz I
Dickson, ACT : UnitingCare Australia, 2009.
In 2009, the federal government released several reform agendas aimed at children, young people, and families: Protecting Children is Everyone's Business: National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009/2020; Investing in the Early Years: A National Early Childhood Development Strategy; Belonging, Being and Becoming: The early years learning framework for Australia; Australian Government Compact with Young Australians: National Partnership on Youth Attainment and Transitions; The National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women: Immediate Government Actions; and The Road Home: A National Approach to Reducing Homelessness. This document reviews and compares each of these key strategies, to examine their alignment with social inclusion principles and whether they 1) incorporate a rights based approach and facilitate agency of young people and families; 2) focus on primary, secondary and tertiary approaches; 3) identify risk factors and prioritise at risk groups; and 4) address investment in improving system capacity and integration.

The new National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children and Young People : 'It's just the beginning'.

SNAICC News May 2009: 6
This article is in three parts. The first discusses the positive points of the new national framework for child protection. The second part briefly looks at how the framework for the strategy was developed. Finally, the third part lists SNAICC's five principles in relation to the national framework: support self determination, negotiate principles, create national outcomes measures, leverage significant new federal investment and transform mainstream service providers.

Protecting children is everyone's business - National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020: an initiative of the Council of Australian Governments.

Council of Australian Governments
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2009.
The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children is an integrated, national plan for addressing child abuse in Australia. It consists of high-level outcomes and strategies aimed at achieving a substantial and sustained reduction in child abuse and neglect over time. This document outlines the principles, supporting outcomes, measures and indicators of change, targets, and planned implementation of the Framework, which were endorsed by all state and territory governments, as well as the federal government, on 30th April 2009. The six supporting outcomes are Children live in safe and supportive families and communities; Children and families access adequate support to promote safety and intervene early; Risk factors for child abuse and neglect are addressed; Children who have been abused or neglected receive the support and care they need for their safety and wellbeing; Indigenous children are supported and safe in their families and communities; Child sexual abuse and exploitation is prevented and survivors receive adequate support. The document also notes current initiatives and reforms in each of the Australian jurisdictions.
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