Rural issues and child abuse

The latest material added to the Australian Institute of Family Studies library database is displayed, up to a maximum of 30 items. Where available online, a link to the document is provided. Many items can be borrowed from the Institute's library via the Interlibrary loan system.

See more resources on Rural issues and child abuse in the AIFS library catalogue

Hospitalised injury in children and young people, 2017-18

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. National Injury Surveillance Unit, Flinders University of South Australia
Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2021.
This report provides information on injuries requiring hospitalisation among children and young people aged 0 to 24, for the year 2017-18. Young adults, males, people in rural and remote areas, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people were particularly likely to be hospitalised for an injury. Patterns and rates of injury in childhood vary greatly with age in ways that often reflect development. Infants experienced the highest rates of drownings, preschool children had the highest rates of burns and falls, older adolescents had the highest rate of Intentional self-harm, and young adults had the highest rates of transport crash and assault injuries.

Co-designing the Child and Family Support System: final qualitative report

DS Consultancy, Think Human (Firm), South Australia. Dept. of Human Services
Adelaide, S. Aust. : Early Intervention Research Directorate, 2020
The South Australian Government is establishing a new system of intensive support services for families and children at risk of child protection involvement. A co-design project was undertaken, with professionals and people with lived experience creating design principles and recommendations to inform the design and implementation of the new system. A summary of the findings and next steps was released in 2019. This new report provides the detailed raw data that informs the summary report and should be seen as a companion document. Chapters include: Building the system with Aboriginal families; Trauma responsive practice; Early help and support system; Designing a system that works in regional and rural contexts; Workforce development; Monitoring, learning and evaluation; and Commissioning.

Improving family violence legal and support services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Langton M, Smith K, Eastman T, O'Neill L, Cheesman E and Rose M
Sydney : ANROWS, 2020.
This report explores the service system available to Aboriginal women's experiencing family violence in regional areas. It investigates what works - and what doesn't - to enable Indigenous women to escape family violence and access legal and support services. Drawing on interviews with victims and service providers in the two regional Victorian and New South Wales towns of Mildura and Albury-Wodonga, it investigates the impact of legislation and policy, the barriers and enablers that impact on these women's capacity to seek assistance from police and support services and to pursue court processes, the accessibility and acceptability of current service, and the specific features of services that encourage access. The report also features a review of the literature on family violence in Indigenous communities, risk factors, the impact of trauma and Intergenerational trauma, and self-determination and services. A separate study was also undertaken on services for Indigenous men who perpetrate family violence.

Inquiry into integrated housing support for vulnerable families

Valentine K, Cripps K, Flanagan K, Habibis D, Martin C and Blunden H
Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2020.
This report looks into housing support for vulnerable families experiencing domestic and family violence can best be integrated with other types of support to enhance safety and wellbeing. It is part of a broader project into integrated housing support for vulnerable families. It discusses the policy context, policies and practices across housing sectors, housing pathways for vulnerable groups, and policy development options regarding crisis and emergency accommodation, social housing, and private rental. The housing and other needs of vulnerable families cannot be met by one sector, and interactions between housing and human services, particularly child protection and family support, can also work against policy aspirations to improve support. Families in remote and regional areas and Indigenous families are also poorly served. However, there are ways to better integrate specialist homelessness services with the broader service system.

The profile and pulse of the sector: findings from the 2019 Australian Community Sector Survey

Cortis N and Blaxland M
Strawberry Hills, NSW : Australian Council of Social Service, 2020.
This report looks at the characteristics, challenges and contribution of the community sector in Australia. It details findings from the 2019 Australian Community Sector Survey, which was conducted with 1,454 community sector staff and leaders. This survey was undertaken by the Social Policy Research Centre on behalf of the Australian Council of Social Service and the network of Councils of Social Service of Australia. Participants were asked about how service users are faring, the factors affecting sector capacity to address poverty and disadvantage, what changes are needed to enhance capacity to respond to changing levels and patterns of service need, organisational-level issues, workforce issues, advocacy work, and funding arrangements and financial sustainability. The findings highlight the growing rates of poverty and disadvantage and the growing levels of unmet need, with many agencies unable to meet demand. This report follows on from a 2019 paper of survey results, which outlined the demand for community services.

Co-design findings and next steps: Child and Family Support System, June-October 2019

South Australia. Dept. of Human Services, DS Consultancy, Think Human (Firm)
Adelaide, S. Aust. : Early Intervention Research Directorate, 2019
The South Australian Government is establishing a new system of intensive support services for families and children at risk of child protection involvement. In order to create meaningful and sustainable change, it was agreed that the new system must be informed and co-designed by the people who need the services and the people who deliver the services. This paper summarises the findings from the co-design project. Agreed values include that the system will be designed with Aboriginal families and communities, involve trauma-responsive practice to create a healing system, establish mechanisms for early help and support, ensure equitable access to help for regional and rural families, and support and strengthen the workforce.

2018-19 annual report

Queensland. Domestic and Family Violence Death Review and Advisory Board
Brisbane, Qld. : Domestic and Family Violence Death Review and Advisory Board, 2019.
The Domestic and Family Violence Death Review and Advisory Board is one mechanism by which the Queensland Government aims to to prevent domestic and family violence deaths. It will undertake systemic reviews of domestic and family violence deaths, identify common systemic failures, gaps or issues, and make recommendations to improve systems and practices. This annual report outlines the Board's work in 2018-2019. It presents findings from a statistical analysis of the deaths of the 320 children and adults killed by family members or intimate partners in Queensland since 2006, as well in-depth reviews of the 24 deaths which were reviewed by the Board in this reporting year. The statistics show that females remain significantly over-represented as victims, and males as perpetrators, in intimate partner homicides, and that actual or pending separation is involved in almost half of cases where there is a history of violence. Filicide represented over 20% of all domestic and family homicides, with children in the first year of life at the greatest risk. There were elevated numbers in geographically isolated areas: a common theme was a lower level of formal service system contact, but a higher level of awareness of the abusive behaviours among informal support networks. The Board also reviewed four apparent suicides of Aboriginal adolescents with a history of direct experience or exposure to significant family violence throughout their childhood.

Demand for community services snapshot, December 2019

Australian Council of Social Service
Strawberry Hills, NSW : Australian Council of Social Service, 2019.
This report profiles the demand for community services in Australia. Data is taken from the 2019 Australian Community Sector Survey, which was conducted with 1,454 community sector staff and leaders and was undertaken by the Social Policy Research Centre on behalf of the Australian Council of Social Service and the network of Councils of Social Service of Australia. Participants answered questions about their experiences of service demand, how demand for their services is changing, and how unmet demand is impacting the community. The findings highlight a significant and increasing unmet demand for community services in Australia, with 60% of the workers reporting an increase in the numbers of clients their service was unable to support and 24% describing their main service as 'rarely' or 'never' able to meet demand. Staff involved in housing and homelessness, financial counselling, and legal services were most likely to report demand pressures, as were those from regional and rural areas. This unmet demand not only contributes to cascading crises for individuals and families, relating to housing, poverty, debt, violence, physical and mental health, and the law, but it also impacts workers, impeding their capacity to work effectively with people with the most complex needs and to undertake advocacy work.

Informing social work practice with theory : reflections on the protection of Aboriginal children in remote communities of Australia.

Nietz H
British Journal of Social Work v. 49 no. 8 Dec 2019: 2021-2041
This article discusses the issue of 'projective identification' for social workers working in child protection practice with Aboriginal families in remote communities of Australia. It highlights the role of reflective practice for social work and the challenge of child protection work in remote Aboriginal communities.

Central Australia Aboriginal Community-Controlled Out-of-home Care Strategy 2019-2023: executive summary.

Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care. Central Australia Aboriginal Community-Controlled Out-of-home Care Strategy Steering Committee
Fitzroy, Vic. : SNAICC, 2019
This paper presents the executive summary of a strategy to help develop community controlled out-of-home care services for Aboriginal people in Central Australia. The strategy aims to restore cultural authority and empower Aboriginal communities to lead and direct the policies, programs and practices that are developed to promote the care and protection of Aboriginal children. The overriding goal is to ensure that Aboriginal children and young people and their families who are in contact with child protection services in the Northern Territory are safe and have the opportunity to thrive through the provision of a holistic scope of quality and culturally safe supports led by Aboriginal families, communities and community-controlled organisations. This paper sets out the strategy's guiding principles, goals, priorities, and key actions. The full version of the strategy has not been published.

Cause and incidence of injuries experienced by children in remote Cape York Indigenous communities.

West C, Fitts M, Rouen C, Muller R and Clough A
Australian Journal of Primary Health v. 25 no. 2 2019: 157-162
This article adds to what is known about the high rates of injuries among Indigenous children in remote communities. Health care clinic data from 2006-2001 from three communities in the Cape York peninsula region of far north Queensland were analysed. Data was available for 563 children aged 0-14 years old. The analysis found that the leading causes of injury were falls, sport accidents, and transport accidents - in line with surveys of the general child population - but also high rates of cutting and piercing, assault, and animal, insect and plant related injuries - more so than the general child population. The study also identified differences in injury patterns and rates between the three communities and that the strengthening of local alcohol restrictions during the study period did not help address injury rates.

Strategic review of Cape York Income Management: final report

Scott J, Higginson A, Staines Z, Zhen L, Ryan V and Lauchs M
Canberra, A.C.T. : Dept. of Social Services, 2018.
Implemented in 2008, the Cape York Welfare Reform initiative aims to address passive dependence on welfare in the communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale, and Mossman Gorge in remote far north Queensland. This review examines one aspect of the reform - income management, including how it was implemented and received and its impact on alcohol and drugs, violence and crime, money for basic needs, schooling, children's health/wellbeing, and child safety notifications. It also looks at ongoing ideological and practical challenges. One key feature of the model as compared to other approaches is that local Indigenous leaders are empowered alongside the Family Responsibilities Commission, who administered the Basic Card and its support services. The review draws on qualitative and quantitative data from 2008-2018. Overall, evidence is mixed, but there is a general feeling that communities have improved since the introduction of the reform, in particular through helping support clients to better manage and budget their income, as well as overcome 'humbugging', which enables them to cover basic needs.

One is too many: trends and patterns in domestic homicides in Canada 2010-2015 : Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations

Dawson M
London, Onc. : Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative, 2018
This report reviews cases of domestic homicide in Canada from 2010-2015, drawing on media reports and court documents. It examines general trends and trends across at four risk population groups: Indigenous people, migrants and refugees, people from rural, remote, and northern communities, and children exposed to domestic violence. These population groups experience factors that enhance their vulnerability to domestic violence and homicide as well as challenges in accessing safety and support. This is the first report of the Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative with Vulnerable Populations, a five-year project to identify risk factors and help prevent homicide in vulnerable populations. This study identified 418 cases of domestic homicide in Canada from 2010-2015: 90% of victims were aged 18 and over, 79% of the adult victims were female, 61% of victims were in a current relationship with the accused perpetrator, and 26% were separated from the accused. 53% of the cases were from one of the four at risk populations.

People who experience family violence [The Justice Project].

Law Council of Australia
The Justice Project : final report. Braddon, A.C.T. : Law Council of Australia, 2018: 84p
This is the final report of the Justice Project, a comprehensive national review into the state of access to justice for at risk groups in Australia. This chapter focuses on the issues facing people experiencing family violence. Leaving an abusive relationship can engender complex legal issues involving separation, parenting, criminal justice, victims of crime assistance, and child protection - victims are often dealing with other forms of disadvantage too. This chapter provides information on the nature and prevalence of family violence, gender inequality, recent inquiries and law reform, the legal needs of people experiencing family violence, how these people respond to their legal problems, the barriers constraining these people from accessing justice, laws and policies that exacerbate barriers, critical service gaps, and priorities for reform. Issues discussed include fear and reluctance to report, cultural competence, re-victimisation and system abuse, self-representation in court by victims or offenders, gaps in rural and remote services, child protection and family violence, police attitudes, enforcement of restraining orders against both parties, the presumption of equal shared parenting in family law, housing and tenancy, and immigration.

Rural child welfare practice : stories from the field.

Riebschleger J and Pierce B
New York : Oxford University Press, 2018.
Written for students and new practitioners, this book presents insights into child welfare practice in the rural context, drawing on case studies from Australia, Canada, and the United States. Chapters include: Theories for rural child welfare; Poverty, pavement, and paying attention: rural child welfare practice in the American Great Plains; Rural resource family and child matching; Cultural humility within rural-practice wisdom; Adoption social work in rural New England; Working with Aboriginal families in Canada; On your country: living and working respectfully with Aboriginal families in rural Australia; Rural social work in a Native American community; Providing services to children of recent military veterans; Domestic violence post-deployment; Coming-out in rural America; Technology and child welfare practice: lessons from Montana; Foster-care stigma and ethical boundary violations in the rural child welfare workplace; Rural relationship, resources, and rhythms: a child welfare training program learns about workforce development for (and from) rural and tribal child welfare workers; and Secondary trauma prevention in rural child welfare: professionals' self-care strategies.

The wellbeing of children and young people: East Gippsland Report 2018

Save the Children Australia
East Melbourne, Vic. : Save the Children Australia, 2018.
This report presents a snapshot of how children and young people are faring in the East Gippsland region of Victoria. Using the latest data, it compares local, state, and national statistics in the domains of the Nest Action Agenda for 'developing well', 'safe and secure', 'happy and healthy', 'engaged, learning, and achieving', and 'active citizens'. This report follows on from the baseline report 'State of East Gippsland's children & youth report' conducted in 2013 by Good Beginnings Australia. That initial report led to the development of the 'Children's Wellbeing Initiative - East Gippsland', led by Save the Children, which aims to strengthen and build collaborative community responses to the needs of local children and youth. It is intended to update the report at least every five years in order to review the progress of the Initiative and ensure monitoring of children and young people's wellbeing. Whilst this second report highlights advances, it reveals that there are still more children in East Gippsland who are developmentally vulnerable than the Victorian average, and with higher rates of family violence, crime victimisation, bullying, additional needs, depression, and low breastfeeding.

Resilient families, strong communities: mapping service expenditure and outcomes in the Pilbara and the Kimberley

Seivwright A, Callis Z and Flatau P
Broome : Regional Services Reform Unit, 2017.
This report looks at Indigenous disadvantage at a sub-regional level, comparing how government spending relates to outcomes and providing greater insight than is seen with the usual national- or state-level comparisons. The report focuses on the Kimberley and Pilbara regions, examining government outcome data and service provision expenditure in the 2015/16 fiscal year. Outcomes are discussed in terms of the seven 'Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage' report areas: governance, leadership and culture; early child development; education and training; healthy lives; economic participation; home environment; and safe and supportive communities. The study finds that government expenditure tends to be higher in areas with poorer outcomes, that is, areas of higher need. Recommendations for further data collection and analysis are also made.

Family violence primary prevention: building a knowledge base and identifying gaps for all manifestations of family violence.

Equality Institute (Organization), Victoria
Melbourne, Vic. : State Government of Victoria, 2017
The Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence highlighted the diversity of experiences of family violence among different populations. To better inform the State Government's 'Prevention of Family Violence and Violence Against Women Strategy', this report was commissioned to investigate the factors that contribute to experiences of family violence among diverse communities, review what is known about what works in prevention with these groups, and identify the key gaps in the evidence that pose a substantive barrier to prevention efforts. This report establishes the state of knowledge and provides an evidence base. The diverse communities reviewed are: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; Older people; Culturally and linguistically diverse communities; Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex communities; Male victims; Rural, regional, and remote communities; People with disabilities; Women in the sex industry; Children; Faith communities; and Women in prison. Recommendations are made for further, targeted research.

Service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: final report

Queensland Productivity Commission
Brisbane, Qld. : Queensland Productivity Commission, 2017.
The Treasurer has asked the Queensland Productivity Commission to investigate service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. There have been many innovative and successful programs implemented by, and for, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, but community outcomes for some programs and services have been mixed. This inquiry aims to understand what works well and why, and considers changes in government investment, service duplication and coordination, evaluation of service design and delivery, and best practice. Service areas include education, employment, health, community safety, housing, and wellbeing. This report presents the final findings and recommendations of the inquiry, and follows on from draft report. It sets out a reform proposal to enable the Queensland Government and communities to achieve real, long lasting and sustainable change, which features a substantial and ambitious package of structural, service delivery, and economic reforms.

An Aboriginal community's perceptions and experiences of child neglect in a rural town.

Newton B
Australian Journal of Social Issues v. 52 no. 3 Sep 2017: 262-277
Despite the high rates of Aboriginal children in the child protection system, very little is known about how child neglect is perceived by Aboriginal parents. This article discusses findings from the author's PhD research, which investigated Aboriginal parents and human services workers' views and experiences on child neglect in a country town in New South Wales. The study found that there are little differences in the way Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people understand child neglect - instead, it is the difficult circumstances experienced by Aboriginal families that keep parents from actualising their parenting expectations.

Service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: draft report

Queensland Productivity Commission
Brisbane, Qld. : Queensland Productivity Commission, 2017.
The Treasurer has asked the Queensland Productivity Commission to investigate service delivery in remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. There have been many innovative and successful programs implemented by, and for, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, but community outcomes for some programs and services have been mixed. This inquiry aims to understand what works well and why, and considers changes in government investment, service duplication and coordination, evaluation of service design and delivery, and best practice. Service areas include education, employment, health, community safety, housing, and wellbeing. This draft report has been released to provide an opportunity for consultation on the issues raised, and invites submissions to help inform the final report.

Reporting the health and development of children in rural and remote Australia

Arefadib N and Moore T
Parkville, Vic. : Centre for Community Child Health, Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, 2017.
This review was commissioned to help inform the improvement of children's access to health services in rural and remote Australia. The review profiles the population characteristics of children in rural and remote Australia; identifies the current context and the developmental health needs of vulnerable children and families in rural and remote Australia; and provides an overview of the evidence on what is causing the status quo, and what is most effective in addressing these issues. The review found that children in the identified rural and remote areas shared many common characteristics and experience challenges in accessing services. Despite gaps in the data, several opportunities for service improvement are identified.

Report and recommendations

Neave M, Faulkner P and Nicholson T
Melbourne, Vic. : Royal Commission into Family Violence, 2016.
The Royal Commission into Family Violence was appointed in February 2015 to investigate how best to reduce and prevent family violence in Victoria and support those affected. In particular, its task was to identify the most effective ways to: prevent family violence; improve early intervention; support victims and address the impacts of violence; make perpetrators accountable; develop and refine systemic responses to family violence; better coordinate community and government responses; and evaluate and measure the success of any strategies, frameworks, policies, programs, and services. Reference is also made to the needs of children, Indigenous peoples, older people, culturally and linguistically diverse communities, faith communities, sexually diverse communities, people with disabilities, male victims, rural and remote communities, incarcerated women, and sex workers. This document presents the findings and recommendations of this inquiry, laid out across 8 sections or 'volumes'.

Hospitalised injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people, 2011-13

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016.
This report provides information about the types and incidence of injuries that lead to hospitalisation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people. It compares hospital separations data from the National Hospital Morbidity Database for 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2013, for causes of injury for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in each group from infancy to young adulthood. Differences by gender and regional area are also reviewed. While Indigenous children and young people experience many of the same types of injuries at similar ages to non-Indigenous children and young people, they experience significantly higher rates of injury at a greater range of ages. Three of the external causes of injury that disproportionately affect Indigenous children and young people are burns - a leading cause of hospitalised injury among children less than 5 years of age, assault - with Indigenous children and young people are more likely to be victims of child abuse, neglect and sexual assault than their non-Indigenous peers, and intentional self-harm - the second most common cause of death from external causes.

Measuring community and service provider attitudes to child sexual abuse in remote Indigenous communities in Western Australia.

Bailey C, Mace G and Powell M
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law v. 23 no. 3 2016: 435-445
This article evaluates a scale for measuring attitudes to child sexual abuse in remote Australian Indigenous communities. The scale was developed to gauge attitudes that may be inhibiting reporting to police, as well as to evaluate whether interventions that focused on collaborative relationships between community members and police resulted in changes in attitudes. The scale was tested in Western Australia with externally-based service providers, community members, and service providers who were also community members - 18% of participants identified as Indigenous.

Go Goldfields Alliance evaluation report 2012-2014

Central Victorian Primary Care Partnership, Go Goldfields (Program)
Maryborough, Vic. : Go Goldfields, Central Goldfields Shire Council, 2015.
'Go Goldfields' is a place-based, collective impact initiative in the Central Goldfields Shire, Victoria. It aims to address complex social issues and improve outcomes for local children, young people and families. Key goals include reduced rates of child protection notifications, improved communication and literacy skills, improved opportunities and positive life experiences for children and their families, improved community connectedness for children, youth and families, improved youth connection to appropriate training and education, and higher rates of breastfeeding. This report evaluates of the first stage of the Go Goldfields Alliance, focusing on the collective impact of the initiative rather than individual programs. The report describes the program and the evaluation methodology, and discusses impacts, learnings, successes and challenges.

Hospitalised injury in children and young people, 2011-12

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Flinders University of South Australia
Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014.
This report provides information on injury in children and young people aged 0 to 24 years requiring hospitalisation, for the year 2011-12. Just over 130,000 children and young people were hospitalised as a result of an injury in 2011-12, boys outnumbering girls by 2 to 1, and with the highest overall rate for males aged 18-24 years. Rates of injury were also higher in rural and remote areas and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people. The report takes a developmental stage approach to examining injury acknowledging that age and injury are more closely linked at some periods of life - for example, early childhood and young adulthood.

The meaning of parenting for vulnerable families participating in a home visiting programme: a critical ethnomethodological study

Caldwell J
2014.
This thesis explores the meaning of parenting for vulnerable families, with the aim of improving practice. Previous research on this topic has taken a 'deficit' approach, with vulnerable families being compared to what is considered the normative standard of high and middle-class families. This new study was conducted with 20 parents participating in a home visiting programme for at risk families in rural Victoria. The findings reveal that the meaning of parenting for vulnerable families is shaped by past and present life experiences, including the impact of previous involvement with child protection services as children, current judgment from professionals, and the resultant hypervigilance in parenting. However, the families developed healthy self- and parental-efficacy and revelled in their parenting role, seeking a better future for their children and experts on their own needs.

The service environment in relationship-based practice : 'it's like a community'.

Reimer E
Children Australia v. 39 no. 1 Mar 2014: 25-33
The family service work environment has been linked to the parent-worker relationship (relationship) for many years. However, there is still much to understand about how the working environment and these relationships are connected. This paper reports on a small-scale qualitative study exploring the story of eight relationships between parents and family workers in four rurally based family services in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Hermeneutics provided a way of examining the dynamics of the relationships, as it enabled an in-depth exploration and interpretation of the participants' perspectives of how they experienced and understood the relationship. It became apparent that the work environment is an important influence on the relationship. New insights that emerged include the important role that staff not directly involved in the relationship (such as other family workers, supervisors, and administration and other professional staff) may play in assisting relationships. They also include the way in which flexible service delivery options support parent feelings of comfort, readiness to change, reciprocity, a sense of ownership to the service and need for support outside of planned appointments (both during and after intervention has ceased). These all support the development and maintenance of such relationships.

Preventing youth sexual violence and abuse in West Cairns and Aurukun: establishing the scope, dimensions and dynamics of the problem : final report

Smallbone S, Rayment-McHugh S and Smith D
Brisbane, Qld. : Dept. of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, 2013.
Queensland Government commissioned this investigation into the scope, dimensions and dynamics of youth sexual violence and abuse in the suburbs of West Cairns and the Aboriginal community of Aurukun, as an evidence base for future prevention initiatives. It discusses reported sexual offences, births to young mothers, and sexually transmitted infections. It also considers possible prevention strategies aimed at potential offenders and potential victims, as well as situational and community approaches. The study draws on official records, case files, site observations, and interviews with professionals and community members. Note, the report has been redacted to conceal personal information.
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