The far-reaching benefits of a good start in life

The far-reaching benefits of a good start in life

Yvonne Kelly

What factors influence children’s and young people’s health and wellbeing? How can prevention and intervention strategies assist more effectively?

The far-reaching benefits of a good start in life

This webinar was held on 13 November 2015.

A full recording of this webinar is available on our YouTube Channel.

The audio, transcript and presentation slides are available under Event Resources on this page.

Lifecourse research has shown that what happens in childhood and adolescence is predictive of many aspects of health and wellbeing throughout life. Children and young people who have a good start in life not only have healthier and happier childhoods, but also enjoy far-reaching benefits in adulthood.

The influences on childhood and adolescent health and development are complex, and their importance often changes during the first two decades of life. Multiple social changes, including family composition, social identities and the use of technologies, might have different influences on development and wellbeing for children, young people, their families and the communities they are growing up in. Past and current research can be used to help forecast likely trends in health and wellbeing, giving important clues relevant for the future of families.

In this webinar, Yvonne Kelly presented an overview of lifecourse research in the UK that documents influences on children’s and young people’s health and wellbeing. Prevention and intervention strategies from different international contexts that aim to improve the life chances of children and young people were discussed.

This event was presented in partnership with Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA).

Family & Relationship Services Australia

   

The feature image is by Heather Katsoulis, CC BY-SA 2.0.

About the presenters

Yvonne Kelly

Yvonne Kelly is Professor of Lifecourse Epidemiology at University College London, and Deputy Director of the International Centre for Lifecourse Studies. She leads work on health and development during childhood and adolescence with a very strong social determinants of health focus.  Professor Kelly is particularly interested in the causes and consequences of social and ethnic inequalities; the ways in which the familial and social contextual influences shape health and development; and the links between early life exposures and later health and development.  To do this work she makes use of longitudinal datasets including the Millennium Cohort Study, and the UK Household Longitudinal Study, the 1958 and 1970 Birth Cohort Studies.

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