What difference do child support payments make to lone mother poverty?

What difference do child support payments make to lone mother poverty?

Dr Christine Skinner, Dr Kay Cook and Dr Sarah Sinclair

In this seminar, the researchers outlined findings from an analysis of the HILDA dataset and compared these results with findings from the UK.

This seminar was held on 14 December 2016.

In this seminar, the researchers outline findings from an analysis of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia dataset and compare these results with findings from a similar study conducted in the UK. The context will be set by explaining the UK study first, the methods used and the findings. Key learnings show how important child support is for lifting lone mothers out of poverty, but only for the minority of lone mothers in the UK who actually receive it (about a third). The seminar will then explore the value of child support payments to the income packages of lone mother families in Australia and, more importantly, examine the impact that these payments have on poverty reduction for families who receive them. It is  found that in Australia, child support is an important source of household income and one that plays a key role in reducing child poverty in the poorest lone mother-headed households.  The presentation will conclude with a discussion of changes to the UK and Australian systems that will shape the poverty reduction potential of child support going forward.

About the presenters

Dr Christine Skinner is a Reader in Social Policy in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at the University of York, UK.

 

Dr Kay Cook from RMIT University was recently awarded an ARC Future Fellow to examine the personal, practical and institutional barriers to child support faced by women in Australia, the UK and USA.

Dr Sarah Sinclair is an Applied Economist in the School of Economics Finance and Marketing at RMIT University.