What next for Australia's longitudinal studies?

What next for Australia's longitudinal studies?

Adam Rowland

This seminar will provide an overview of the context of Australia’s longitudinal studies and the role of various actors in the Australian environment.

This seminar was held on Thursday 22nd June 2017.

Today Australia has a rich tapestry of major national longitudinal studies that sit within a broader longitudinal studies ecosystem, which also includes a plethora of other studies that are more focussed in terms of geography and/or subject matter. However, this was not the case a mere 20 years ago when Australian researchers often used data from international sources to draw inferences about the Australian ‘lived-experience’ and policy settings. While we have come a very long way, we now find ourselves at the threshold of another step-change.

The Australian Government recently reaffirmed its commitment to the four major national longitudinal studies managed by the National Centre for Longitudinal Data (NCLD) by providing additional funding in the May 2017 Federal Budget to maintain the studies. These studies are The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC), the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) and Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA).  In addition to continuing to manage these studies, the NCLD is looking to examples of international better practice to maximise the separate and cumulative investments in Australia’s longitudinal studies to date.

This presentation will provide an overview of the context of Australia’s longitudinal studies and the role of various actors in the Australian environment, highlighting particular opportunities that exist to unlock the value of these nationally valuable assets.  Further, specific activities of the NCLD will be discussed that are intended to capitalise on these opportunities. The presentation will appeal to anyone with an interest in the design or delivery of longitudinal studies, and the use of longitudinal evidence to inform policy.

About the presenters

Since October 2015 Adam has been the Executive Manager of the National Centre for Longitudinal Data (NCLD) within the Australian Government Department of Social Services (DSS).

AIFS news

Get the latest news about our publications, research and upcoming events.

Subscribe