Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children - 2nd LSAC Research Conference

Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children - 2nd LSAC Research Conference

Media release — 30 November 2009

How are Australian children and families faring today? These issues will be explored at the second Conference of Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) in Melbourne this week.

When: Thursday 3rd and Friday 4th December 2009
Where: Rydges on Swanston, 701 Swanston Street, Carlton, VIC

  • Australian children today are less physically active and more likely to be overweight or obese than children born 20 years ago.
  • But they also tend to be less anxious and have better social skills.
  • And they are more likely than children born in the 1980’s to have a mother who works, and to attend childcare.

How are Australian children and families faring today? These issues will be explored at the second Conference of Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) in Melbourne this week.

LSAC is a unique study that follows 10,000 Australian families over time. It looks at children’s development - from physical health, to their education, social skills and behaviour, and provides insights into how the current generation of children is developing.

The study inspired ABC TV’s 7-Up style “Life at 1” and “Life at 3” documentaries, which have provided a fascinating glimpse into children’s lives and the impact of different types of families on their growing up. “Life at 5” is currently in production.

Researchers and policy makers from around the country will present research and discuss new ideas arising out of LSAC data. Keynote speakers at the Conference are:

  • Professor Andrew Leigh – (Thursday) – Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences. Professor Leigh will present new research into the impacts of childcare and other non-parental types of care on children.
  • Professor Ann Sanson – (Friday) – University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics. Professor Sanson’s presentation looks at the social, emotional, learning and health problems in Australian children and examines whether there are common risk factors that could be addressed to improve their outcomes.

Growing Up in Australia : The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children is conducted in partnership between the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

Media contacts

Luisa Saccotelli
0400 149 901
Aileen Muldoon
0419 112 503