Alissar El-Murr

Alissar El-Murr

Senior Research Officer
Australian Institute of Family Studies
Dip Youth Work (VU), BSocSci (Hons; RMIT), PhD (La Trobe)

Alissar is a social scientist and qualitative researcher with over 10 years experience working in the areas of violence against women and children, law and policy analysis, and public health. Alissar has worked in academic settings, government and non-government organisations, and is regularly granted opportunities to contribute to evaluations regarding violence against women, and to workforce development in the areas of intersectionality and cultural safety. Alissar has expertise in trauma-informed practice, and has worked with refugee and immigrant communities in Australia and the Middle East. In 2012, Alissar was awarded the Harold Mitchell Travelling Fellowship to complete a research project for UN Women in Cairo, and develop recommendations for a framework to eliminate violence against women and girls in Egypt. Alissar completed a PhD at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (La Trobe University) in 2017. The PhD thesis is a critical policy study investigating the development of policies about violence against women in Victoria, Australia, with a focus on policy making communities addressing the issue of sexual assault.

As well as engaging in high-level policy work, Alissar includes the voices of those most affected by violence as much as possible in her research, engaging communities with lived experience and practitioners with service expertise through fieldwork and consultation. At the Institute, Alissar works in the Family Policy and Practice Research Team and has previously collaborated with Child Family Community Australia (CFCA), and the Family Law and Sexual Violence Research Teams. Her current projects include a multi-year review of the Local Support Coordinator in family and domestic violence services across Australia, and a process evaluation of the Third Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and Children.