Andrew Armstrong

Andrew Armstrong

Research Fellow
Australian Institute of Family Studies
BA (Swin), PGDipAppPsy (Swin), PhD (Swin)

Dr Andrew Armstrong is a psychologist and Research Fellow with the Australian Gambling Research Centre . Andrew is invested in rigorous research projects and partnerships which directly inform policy and practice.
Andrew's current research interests include life course and longitudinal investigations of the causes and consequences of gambling problems. Andrew's primary responsibilities are managing the studies, Gambling in the Australian Temperament Project  and, Gambling in the Household Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA).

In addition to gambling research, Andrew has a history of health, economic and social policy-related research. He has undertaken consultancies for a broad range of organisations including the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM), National Health and Hospitals' Reform Commission (NHHRC), Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP).

Selected publications

Delfabbro, P., Thomas, A., & Armstrong, A. (2017). Gender differences in the presentation of observable risk indicators of problem gambling.  Journal of Gambling Studies, 1-14. DOI: 10.1007/s10899-017-9691-5.

Delfabbro, P., Thomas, A., & Armstrong, A.R. (2016). Observable indicators and behaviours for the identification of problem gamblers in venue environments. Journal of Behavioral Addiction, 0, 1-10. DOI: 10.1556/2006.5.2016.065.

Armstrong, A.R.,Herrmann, S., Carrieri, P., Chassany O., Duracinsky, M. (2016). The international development of PROQOL-HCV: An instrument to assess the health-related quality of life of persons living with the Hepatitis C virus. BMC Infectious Diseases. 16:443, 1-11.

Lalanne, C., Chassany, O., Carrieri, P., Armstrong, A. R., Marcellin, F., Lert, F., Spire, B., Dray-Spira, R., Durackinsy, M. (2016) A reduced factor structure for the PROQOL-HIV questionnaire provided reliable indicators of health-related quality of life. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 72, 116-125.

Thomas, A., Christensen, D., Deblaquiere, J., Armstrong, A., Moore, S., Carson, R., Rintoul, A., (2016) Review of electronic gaming machine (EGM) pre-commitment features: Limit setting. Australian Gambling Research Centre.

Thomas, A., Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., Armstrong, A., Moore, S., Carson, R., et al. (2016). Review of electronic gaming machine (EGM) pre-commitment features: Transaction history statements. Australian Gambling Research Centre.

Thomas, A., Carson, R., Christensen, D., Deblaquiere, J., Armstrong, A., Moore, S., Rintoul, A., (2016). Review of electronic gaming machine (EGM) pre-commitment features: Self-exclusion. Australian Gambling Research Centre.

Duracinsky, M., Armstrong, A., Herrmann, S., Lalanne, C., Galano, E., Da Silva, MH., Carrieri, PM., Chassany, O. (2015). Psychometric validation of the new international questionnaire to assess health-related quality of life (HRQL) specific to viral hepatitis C: PROQOL HCV. Value in Health, 18(7), A591-2.

Lalanne, C., Armstrong, A.R., Herrmann, S., Le Coeur, S., Carrieri, P., Chassany O., & Duracinsky, M. (2015). Psychometric assessment of health-related quality of life and symptom experience in HIV patients treated with antiretroviral therapy. Quality of Life Research, 24 (6): 1407-1418.

Lalanne, C., Armstrong, A.R., Herrmann, S., Le Coeur, S., Carrieri, P., Chassany O., & Duracinsky, M. (2014). Joint analysis of reported symptoms and health-related quality of life endpoints in HIV patients: A way to improve health care. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 28:63

Thomas, A.C., Delfabbro, P., & Armstrong, A.R. (2014). Validation study of in-venue problem gambler indicators. Report prepared for Gambling Research Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 35 (4) 383-389.

Thomas, A. C., Pfeifer, J., Moore, S., Meyer, D., Yap, L. Armstrong, A. (2013). Evaluation of the removal of ATMs from gaming venues in Victoria, Australia. Melbourne: Swinburne University of Technology. Report prepared for Department of Justice, Victorian Government.