Programs to improve interpersonal safety in Indigenous communities

Programs to improve interpersonal safety in Indigenous communities

Evidence and issues

Andrew Day, Ashlen Francisco and Robin Jones

Closing the Gap— July 2013
Programs to improve interpersonal safety in Indigenous communities: Evidence and issues

You are in an archived section of the AIFS website. Archived publications may be of interest for historical reasons. Because of their age, they do not reflect current research data or AIFS' current research methodologies.

The issue of safety in Indigenous communities has generated great interest over recent years. Under the Northern Territory Emergency Response (NTER) of 2007, for example, a wide range of services and programs have been implemented that aim to reduce rates of violence, substance abuse, and child abuse and neglect and, more broadly, to promote communities in which people feel safer and in which violence will not be tolerated. This issue paper reviews the effectiveness of such programs that address community safety in either Indigenous or non-Indigenous settings. It outlines what works, what doesn't, and what further research is needed.

This report was for the Closing the Gap Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse was a Council of Australian Governments’ initiative jointly funded by all Australian Governments. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Family Studies was funded from 2009 to 2014 to deliver the Clearinghouse.

Programs to improve interpersonal safety in Indigenous communities: Evidence and issues (PDF 359 KB)

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