Annual report 2016-17

Annual report 2016-17

Annual Report – October 2017

You are in an archived section of the AIFS website. Archived publications may be of interest for historical reasons. Because of their age, they may not reflect current research data or AIFS' current research methodologies.

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) has had another successful year creating and communicating knowledge to bring about positive outcomes for families.

The year 2016/17 was the first of our Strategic Directions 2016-2020: our four-year transformational journey to ensure that our internal culture and systems align with our aspirations for our research to have maximum impact. We are well respected for our research excellence but we know that the key to having impact is to ensure that we help to close the gap between "what is known" and "what is done" for families. This report demonstrates the progress we are making towards achieving our 2020 goals.

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1. Director's review

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) has had another successful year creating and communicating knowledge to bring about positive outcomes for families.

The year 2016/17 was the first of our Strategic Directions 2016-2020: our four-year transformational journey to ensure that our internal culture and systems align with our aspirations for our research to have maximum impact. We are well respected for our research excellence but we know that the key to having impact is to ensure that we help to close the gap between "what is known" and "what is done" for families. This report demonstrates the progress we are making towards achieving our 2020 goals.

Research highlights 2016/17

During the past year we worked on 48 projects, and continued to extend our expertise and experience to make a significant contribution to practice and policy development in a wide range of family wellbeing areas.

Growing Up in Australia

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) follows the development of 10,000 children and their families in urban and rural areas of Australia and continues to provide insights into the paths Australian children and their families take through life. The study addresses a range of questions about children and adolescent development and wellbeing and is conducted as a partnership between us, the Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Wave 7 fieldwork was completed in the reporting period, and phase 1 of Wave 8 fieldwork has started, with interviews commencing in June 2017. The LSAC Annual Statistical Report 2015, which reported on the first five waves of LSAC data, was released in October 2016. The report highlights diversity and change in Australian families and features chapters on several areas of childhood and adolescent development and wellbeing including choice of primary school, grandparent care, children's screen time, immunisation, complex families and puberty.

Beyond 18: Longitudinal Study of Leaving Care

Each year in Victoria between 300-400 young people who have been living in foster care, or other out-of-home care arrangements, will turn 18 and no longer be under the care of the Victorian state government. Many of these young people don't have family or friends to rely on for support when they leave the care system. The Institute's Beyond 18 study focuses on the experiences of young people leaving the care system in Victoria. Wave 2 of the study launched in July 2016 and the recruitment of participants continued throughout the reporting period. The Beyond 18 team is now developing the third wave of the study to be launched later in 2017. In May, the Beyond 18 team released preliminary results from the Wave 1 survey. More than 200 young people, aged 16-19, completed the Wave 1 survey. This makes it the biggest ever survey of care leavers in Victoria. The results provided rich information about the complex issues within the Victorian leaving care system.

Building a New Life in Australia

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA) is a long-term research project examining how humanitarian migrants settle into a new life in Australia. In 2016/17, the fourth wave of data for the study was collected, and planning for the fifth wave is well underway. The study has continued to be well received by participants with very high response rates being achieved. In fact, a higher number of participants completed an interview in the fourth wave than in the third wave.

In the last year, the BNLA team examined humanitarian migrants English language proficiency, levels of education and whether they were engaged in employment, and how these outcomes have changed over time since their arrival in Australia. These findings have been presented at a panel discussion organised by the Department of Social Services and various social policy and migration themed conferences.

Family Wellbeing Study: Transition and Wellbeing Research Programme

The Department of Veterans' Affairs' Transition and Wellbeing Research Programme is the most comprehensive study undertaken in Australia to examine the impact of military service on the mental, physical and social health of serving and transitioned personnel and their families. AIFS is contracted to undertake the Family Wellbeing Study part of the program. This study aims to understand the health and wellbeing of ADF members' families after they transition from the ADF to civilian life and how they compare to the wellbeing of families of current serving members. In 2016/17, AIFS conducted qualitative interviews and a report is currently being drafted.

Data Linkage Integration Authority

On behalf of the Children and Families Secretaries (CAFS), DSS commissioned AIFS to produce a scoping report about Commonwealth and state and territory governments' data-sharing priorities and activities. The report is based on consultations with representatives of the state and territory governments. It reports on the importance and policy implications of the six CAFS projects and summarises the data-sharing work already happening. Feedback on the challenges to data sharing are described as well as differing models of how data linkage could be organised.

Australian Gambling Research Centre

Gambling is a major public policy issue in Australia, affecting the health and wellbeing of many families. The Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) conducts policy and practice relevant research informed by a public health population-level approach. It raises awareness and understanding of the potential effects of gambling, and contributes to informed debate in the community to prevent and reduce harm from gambling.

In the last year, we conducted several significant research projects that helped inform policy-makers and the gambling industry to identify the symptoms and reduce the risk of gambling harm. These projects include: 

  • Informal recovery from gambling problems:
    This study examined informal recovery from gambling problems in younger and older adults who had self-identified as recovering or recovered from gambling problems. Interviews were used to explore the processes by which gamblers moved from recognition of a gambling problem to action for recovery. It found that the impetus, process and goals of recovery were best described by pathways that were distinguished by either externally directed or self-directed agency in recovery.
  • Assisting gamblers in venues:
    Gambling venues' codes of conduct describe how venues should assist people displaying signs of problematic gambling. This research investigated whether venues complied to these codes' strategies related to supporting "responsible gambling" and discouraging harmful, intensive and extended gambling. The evidence demonstrated that venues often fail to respond to signs of gambling problems and instead encourage continued gambling in contradiction of their responsibilities.
  • Gambling in culturally and linguistically diverse communities in Australia:
    This research examined the available literature about gambling participation within culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Australia. 

Families and Children Activity Expert Panel

To contribute to positive outcomes for vulnerable children and families, the Expert Panel project aims to support services funded through the Department of Social Services' Families and Children Activity to increase the use of evidence in their programs. This includes providing advice, resources and services to build service providers' capacity to plan, implement and evaluate programs; adopt evidence-based programs when appropriate and relevant to clients' needs; and/or improve existing programs.

Activities in 2016/17 included: 

  • working with more than 30 Communities for Children Facilitating Partners and undertaking assessment of programs in relation to the 30-50% contract requirement for evidence-based programs;
  • assessing more than 80 programs for the "guidebook" of evidence-based programs, or assessment of programs already being delivered; and
  • administering the Industry List, with 18 currently active or completed projects. 

Communicating our research

Communicating our research findings to a wide range of audiences, including policy-makers, practitioners and other researchers is a key AIFS function.

We do this through our publications, through our information exchange services such as Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) and by researchers presenting at conferences and events, including online webinars. The Institute's research is widely reported in the media and promoted through our websites and social media.

In 2016/17, AIFS also introduced a fresh new look featuring new colours and a graphic element for our website, social media and stationery. The main "circle" graphic element symbolises the life cycle of people as they move through different stages of life - from being born into a family, growing to adulthood and transitioning through to old age. The new design helps to powerfully convey the research of the Institute to better impact on families in Australia.

Child Family Community Australia

The Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange, funded by DSS, continues to be a primary source of evidence-based resources and publications for the child, family and community welfare sector. In 2016/17, the CFCA website received over 2.8 million page views and reached the milestone of 8,000 subscribers to the fortnightly e-newsletter. CFCA produced 18 publications this financial year, and the monthly webinar program continues to attract large numbers of attendees per session (over 4,500 participants in total) - playing a significant role in professional development for the sector. User feedback indicates that content is useful in ways that relate to CFCA impact measures, including increased knowledge of the latest research and increased use of evidence in policy and practice.

2016 AIFS Conference, 6-8 July 2016

The AIFS 2016 Conference Research to Results: Using Evidence to Improve Outcomes for Families was held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC) from 6-8 July 2016. Three keynote speakers headlined the program: Professor Greg Duncan, Professor John Lynch and Justice Jennifer Coate. The program also featured a Q and A panel hosted by ABC journalist Annabel Crabb, as well as a further 169 oral presentations, 29 poster presentations and two evening workshops. More than 480 delegates from across Australia and overseas attended the event, including from Canada, Singapore, the USA, New Zealand and Austria.

The event received substantial coverage across radio, newspaper, Internet and television media, as well as social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter. The conference provided a valuable opportunity for researchers, policy-makers and service practitioners to come together to discover and discuss the latest research on issues affecting Australian families.

Publications

The Institute continued to publish outstanding research into Australian families, with 71 project reports and papers produced, and more than 3 million publications viewed or downloaded from our websites. We have also produced a host of short articles, news pieces, infographics, fact sheets and practice resources. In the past year, publishing highlights include authoritative reports on flexible child care, understanding parenting disputes after separation, forced adoption support services and principles of trauma-informed approaches to child sexual abuse.

Financial performance

In the 2016/17 financial year, AIFS operated with $4,458,000 of government appropriation and $7,127,030 of other revenue (primarily from contracted research), as detailed in Chapter 5: Financial statements. The Institute incurred a budget deficit for the financial year 2016/17 of $166,778. This deficit is primarily due to the depreciation expense for 2016/17 of $412,121. After adjusting for this item, AIFS reported a surplus of $245,343.

Outlook for 2017/18

Our focus for the next 12 months is to embed knowledge translation and exchange capabilities across the whole of the organisation, harness our capabilities to communicate the results of our work, and to continue to close the gap between evidence and implementation.

Our priorities in 2017/18 include:

  • implementing a national strategic research agenda;
  • building our knowledge brokerage profile and activity;
  • adapting our communication platforms to ensure our research is discoverable and accessible;
  • embedding knowledge translation capability at the whole-of-organisation level; and
  • strengthening our capability, systems and practices to accurately plan, monitor and deliver our work.

We will continue to experiment, test new ideas and adapt to face our changing environment and to achieve the research excellence for which we are known.

I would like to acknowledge the incredibly talented and committed team at AIFS for their hard work in delivering our results this year. Their dedication to generating and communicating evidence and advice to support the wellbeing of families is one of our greatest assets. Together with our shared vision and actions, I am confident that we will achieve our 2020 goals.

2. Agency overview

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) is a Melbourne-based statutory agency of the Australian Government, established in February 1980 under the Australian Family Law Act 1975.

The Institute operates within the Department of Social Services (DSS) portfolio. The Institute also has close links with the Attorney-General’s Department, the Department of Education and Training, the Department of Human Services, the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Department of Defence, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs and other Australian Government portfolios, their departments and agencies. Staff of the Institute are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. At 30 June 2017, 84 people were employed at the Institute, excluding the Director.

Role and functions

The Institute aims to increase understanding of factors affecting how Australian families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy-makers, service providers, researchers and the broader community.

The 2016/17 AIFS Agency Plan documents a set of research domains and guides the research undertaken, including commissioned projects. These three research domains are:

  • family relationships;
  • social and economic participation; and
  • child and family wellbeing.

The Institute facilitates and communicates research findings through its research publications, conferences, websites, information exchanges, information services, presentations, seminars and webinars, representation and through mass media.

The AIFS Agency Plan 2016/17 outlines the roles and functions of the Institute for this annual reporting period. The four strategic priorities outlined in the plan are:

  • Create knowledge about families and communities.
  • Communicate knowledge about families and communities.
  • Connect research, policy and practice.
  • Activate organisational capability.

Organisational structure

The Director is responsible for providing overall leadership of the Institute and is supported by two Deputy Directors—Deputy Director (Research) and Deputy Director (Corporate & Strategy). This group works together to lead a team of managers responsible for the day-to-day work of the Institute in meeting its strategic objectives (see Figure 2.1).

The Deputy Director (Research) is responsible for the Institute’s research program, which includes a wide range of research, evaluation and dissemination projects focusing on policy-and practice-relevant issues affecting families in Australia.

The Deputy Director (Corporate and Strategy) is responsible for the management of services to support the Institute’s research activities, including human, financial and physical resources, information and communications technology, communication services and corporate governance.

Research managers oversee teams of research staff who work on a range of commissioned and internally initiated projects. During the reporting period this included two information exchanges—the Australian Gambling Research Centre and the Child Family Community Australia information exchange—and four longitudinal studies.

The Corporate and Strategy area supports the Institute’s research activities by providing administrative and specialist functions such as library, publishing, finance, information technology, communications, human resources and business capability services.

Figure 2.1: AIFS organisational structure as at 30 June 2017

Figure 2.1: AIFS organisational structure as at 30 June 2017

Outcome and program structure

In this reporting period, the Institute operated within the Australian Government’s outcome and output framework published in the DSS Portfolio Budget Statements 2016/17 (PBS) and the AIFS Agency Plan 2016/17 to 2019/20. The Institute has a single planned outcome:

Outcome 1Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy-makers, service providers and the broader community.

All Institute activities have been directed to achieving this outcome. Key performance criteria, detailed in Chapter 3: Report on performance, measure the Institute’s core outputs and deliverables. The Institute’s management accountability performance is described in Chapter 4: Management and accountability, and its finances in Chapter 5: Financial statements.

3. Report on performance

Performance statement

The Institute has a single planned outcome:

Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy-makers, service providers and the broader community.

To achieve this outcome, the Institute:

  • conducts high quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding the wellbeing of Australian families;
  • through collaborative partnerships expands the national knowledge base of factors affecting families;
  • increases the effectiveness of communications to foster greater understanding about factors that affect families; and
  • builds organisational capacity to achieve research and communication objectives.

In 2016/17, five new performance measures were introduced to better reflect the work of the Institute and ensure a more robust evaluation of its research and dissemination strategies. While results from these measures were mixed, client and stakeholder satisfaction rates were high, which demonstrates AIFS’ commitment to focusing on customer needs and building strong working relationships.

The Institute also operated within a continuing environment of fiscal restraint in this reporting period. This has primarily affected the ability of other organisations to initiate and fund new projects, which in turn resulted in a decrease in research outputs—see Table 3.1 for performance criteria. Despite these constraints, indicators that were less affected by funding constraints exceeded their targets, demonstrating that the Institute continues to perform at a high level and achieve its stated outcome.

AIFS research domains

The Institute’s research program during the reporting period was structured around the three research domains established under the AIFS 2016/17 Agency Plan:

  • family relationships;
  • social and economic participation; and
  • child and family wellbeing.

Research activities are either initiated by the Institute or commissioned by another organisation. Institute-initiated research is funded from the budget appropriation.

Research projects conducted by the Institute range in scale and type, and include:

  • research projects that provide evidence relating to social policy issues;
  • major evaluations and reviews of government policies and programs;
  • longitudinal studies that provide valuable data on children and their families;
  • specialist advisory services commissioned by government agencies; and
  • information exchanges that identify, collect, evaluate and synthesise research resources about a specialist field and communicate that information to policy and practice professionals.

In addition, the Institute is regularly involved in broader Australian Government policy and research processes through its preparation of submissions to inquiries and provision of research and evaluation services to other organisations. AIFS also promotes research collaboration by sharing data nationally and internationally and making presentations at a wide range of local and overseas conferences and other meetings (see Appendix C, for details).

  • AIFS communicates its research through a variety of channels including information exchange activities, publications, conferences, seminars and webinars, web-based content, and library help desk and bibliographic services. These communication activities deliver research findings to three broad groups:
  • policy-makers, to inform the development and review of policies and programs affecting families;
  • service providers, to improve professional practice that supports families; and
  • the research and general communities, to raise understanding and knowledge of family functioning.

Performance criteria

The report on the Institute’s performance criteria for 2016/17 (Table 3.1) is based on measures outlined in both the DSS Portfolio Budget Statements and the AIFS 2016/17 Agency Plan. These measures are divided into four key categories:

  • Create knowledge about families and communities.
  • Communicate knowledge about families and communities.
  • Connect research, policy and practice.
  • Activate organisational capability. 
Table 3.1: Performance criteria: Actuals (2015/16 to 2016/17) and forward estimate (2017/18)
Criteria Actual
2015/16
Target
2016/17
Actual
2016/17
Forward estimate
2017/18
Create knowledge about families and communities
Number of bodies commissioning work by AIFS 21 20 20 20
Number of research projects at AIFS 52 45 48 45
Number of longitudinal studies at AIFS 4 5 4 5
Communicate knowledge about families and communities
Number of publications disseminated or downloaded from AIFS website 2.93m 3.00m 3.03m 3.20m
Total media mentions of AIFS research1 9,391 3,500 5,553 5,000
Number of publications released by AIFS 91 100 71 100
Number of presentations given by AIFS staff 78 100 104 100
Number of bibliographic records generated at AIFS 2,470 2,000 1,820 2,200
Connect research, policy and practice
Total attendance at AIFS conferences, webinars and forums 3,210 2,500 4,961 3,000
Number of partnerships, MOUs and collaborations in place2 8 28 10
Numbers of conferences, seminars and forums hosted 14 18 16 18
Government submissions 12 7 12
Activate organisational capability
Percentage of research staff with postgraduate qualifications 74% 60% 64.8% 60%
Reduction in operational costs 5% 6.3% 5%
Percentage of clients satisfied with AIFS’ services 80% 100% 85%
Percentage of stakeholders satisfied with AIFS’ services 80% 91.5% 85%

Notes:

1. Data provided by iSentia.
2. This figure relates to the total number of partnerships, MOUs and collaborations in place throughout 2016/17.

Analysis of performance

Create knowledge about families and communities

The number of commissioning bodies is indicative of the spread of research undertaken at the Institute. The measure also highlights that the Institute is not reliant on a single source of income. In 2016/17, AIFS was commissioned by 20 organisations to undertake research projects, which was exactly the target measure.

The Institute undertook 48 research projects during the reporting period, which was above the performance target. It should be noted that this number includes a number of smaller research reports and other project types including scoping studies.

The Institute was involved in four longitudinal studies during the reporting period:

  • Australian Temperament Project;
  • Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study of Leaving Care;
  • Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants; and
  • Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.

The number of longitudinal studies has been included as a performance measure because these studies are useful for analysing trends in development. The nature of such studies requires a longer-term commitment of resources by funding and partner bodies, often over a number of years. In 2016/17, within a fiscally constrained environment, the number of longitudinal studies is slightly below target.

Communicate knowledge about families and communities

The number of AIFS publications printed and downloaded indicates the uptake of the Institute’s published findings. In 2016/17, the 3.03 million publications distributed was above the target. A complete list of Institute research outputs and publications for 2016/17 is available in Appendix C.

The number of media mentions was again higher than the target for 2016/17, which highlights AIFS’ strong commitment to communicating research to a wide audience. The 5,553 media mentions were 59% above the 2016/17 target. The continued interest from online, print, television and radio journalists provides a valuable conduit for research about Australian families.

AIFS produced 71 research outputs in 2016/17, which was below the target, mainly due to the analysis and release of findings of larger projects extending into the new financial year. Outputs for the year include both AIFS published materials as well as external publications based on AIFS research. The Institute published two research reports, five commissioned reports and two issues of Family Matters.

AIFS staff made 104 presentations in this reporting period, which was above the target and significantly higher than the previous year’s total (78). This highlights that AIFS staff have shown a stronger commitment to research dissemination and stakeholder engagement.

Bibliographic records provide a description of material related to family studies that have been published by AIFS or others, and help to provide a valuable reference resource for researchers in this field. The 1,820 records generated in the reporting period was slightly down on the target mainly due to the Institute’s library team downsizing their operation.

Connect research, policy and practice

The 4,961 participants that attended AIFS events throughout the year were substantially higher (98.4%) than the target of 2,500 participants. This is partly because of the AIFS 2016 Conference as well as online webinars conducted by the CFCA information exchange being popular. Appendix C provides a complete list of these events.

Partnerships, MOUs and collaborations enable AIFS to widen the scope of our research capabilities, which further helps to reach our yearly research and dissemination goals. The Institute had 28 partnerships, MOUs and collaborations in place during the reporting period, which was substantially higher than the target of eight. In wake of the much higher figure, the target for the number of partnerships, MOUs and collaborations will be increased in the next AIFS Agency Plan 2017/18 and Portfolio Budget Statements.

The number of conferences, seminars and other events hosted by AIFS was slightly lower than forecast, with the Institute hosting 16 events. The lower number of events was mainly due to the decision to decrease the number of face-to-face seminars held at the Institute.

Government submissions were included as a new measure in 2016/17 as they are an important avenue for highlighting the latest AIFS research and for informing government policy. As there were only a small number of parliamentary inquiries relevant to AIFS research expertise, the seven submissions prepared were below the target of 12 submissions.

Activate organisational capability

An indication of the Institute’s capability and readiness to undertake high quality research is the proportion of researchers with postgraduate qualifications. In 2016/17, 64.8% of researchers at the Institute held postgraduate qualifications, which is substantially higher than the target of60%.

The reduction in operational costs is a measure to determine whether AIFS is delivering services efficiently. In 2016/17, the Institute achieved a 6.3% reduction in its corporate operational cost by decreasing expenditure from $12.54 million in 2015/16 to $11.75 million in 2016/17.

The percentage of clients satisfied with AIFS’ services is a key quality measure that determines the Institute’s effectiveness in working with external clients to deliver projects that are fit for purpose and within agreed time frames. Although only 11 clients who commissioned AIFS projects in 2016/17 responded to a survey regarding their satisfaction with AIFS, the results highlighted that 100% were satisfied with the services AIFS provided, which is above the forecast.

The percentage of stakeholders satisfied with AIFS’ services is also another important new measure that helps to demonstrate whether AIFS has delivered products and services that meet the needs of our users. In surveying subscribers to AIFS newsletters, 91.5% of the 494 respondents indicated they were satisfied or very satisfied with AIFS services, which again was above the forecast.

Performance against AIFS research directions

This section reviews the major projects undertaken by AIFS during the reporting period, within the framework of the Institute’s three research domains.

The majority of the Institute’s research projects relate to more than one research domain. A summary of the projects is provided in Table 3.2.

A full list of publications and presentations produced by the Institute during the reporting period is included in Appendix C.

More details about major work being conducted by the Institute are available on the AIFS website.

Table 3.2: AIFS research projects 2016/17 and relevance to research domains
  Research domains
Project title Duration Project funder (Partner) Family relationships Social & economic participation Child & family wellbeing
Australian Gambling Research Centre Ongoing Appropriation X X X
Australian Temperament Project 1983– Melbourne Uni., Deakin Uni., RCH X X X
Best practice design elements and treatment approaches suitable for young people in residential out-of-home care settings: Rapid Literature Review 2016–2017 DHHS     X
Betting Restrictions: Online wagering 2017 DSS X X  
Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study of Leaving Care 2012–2018 DHHS   X X
Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA): Settlement barriers analysis project 2016–2017 DSS   X X
Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA): The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants 2012–2018 DSS   X X
Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA): Three Es analysis project 2016–2017 DSS   X X
Census of workforces that intersect with family violence 2016–2017 KPMG     X
Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange 2011–2019 DSS X X X
Children and young people in separated families: Family law system experiences and needs 2016–2018 AGD X X X
Data Linkage Integration Authority Ongoing Appropriation X X X
Development of an evaluation tool and methodology for Playgroup Programmes 2016–2017 DSS   X X
Direct cross-examination in Family Law research 2017 AGD     X
Domestic and Family Violence and Parenting: Mixed method insights into impact and support needs 2014–2017 ANROWS X   X
DVA coordinated client support program (CCS) 2017–2018 SPRC at UNSW     X
Economic costs of family violence   KPMG X X X
Elder Abuse Prevalence Scoping Study 2016–2017 AGD X    
Empowering Migrant and Refugee Women 2016–2017 DSS X X X
Ethical review for the 2015 cohort of the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2016–2026 NCVER   X X
Families and Children Activity Expert Panel 2014–2019 DSS X X X
Family and Relationship Services (FaRS) and Specialised Family Violence Services (SFVS) surveys 2017 DSS X   X
Family law developments Ongoing Appropriation X X X
Family Wellbeing Study: Transition and Wellbeing Research Programme 2014–2018 DVA X   X
Family Wellbeing Study: Transition and Wellbeing Research Programme—qualitative component 2016–2017 DVA X   X
Forced Adoptions Community of Practice, Knowledge Translation and Exchange (KTE) 2015–2016 DSS X   X
Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children 2009–2019 DSS/ABS X X X
Guidance and Training on Forced Adoptions for Health Professionals: Independent contractor agreement 2014– APS X   X
Knowledge Circle: Indigenous Child and Family Portal 2013–2016 DSS X X X
Locational disadvantage analysis and communities with potential 2016–2017 DSS   X X
Longitudinal research proposal for additional humanitarian intake 2016 DSS   X X
Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC)/NAPLAN data Linkage for DSS 2016–2017 DSS X   X
Longitudinal study on male and female children in the Philippines 2016 DFAT     X
National Gambling Reporting System (NGRS) 2016–2017 DSS   X X
Pathways of Care Longitudinal Study: Working Group 2016 FACS X X X
Pathways to support services for victim/survivors of child sexual abuse and their families 2015–2017 Royal Commission X   X
Perpetrator interventions Research Agreement 2016 2017–2019 ANROWS X   X
Provision of data from the childhood education and care Australia collection 2016–2017 Mitchell Institute     X
Provision of services as part of the VRGF: Preventing gambling related harm study 2016–2017 Monash Uni.   X X
Relationship between mental health and sexual assault: Literature review 2014–2016 Melbourne Uni. X   X
Scoping of Five Children and Families Secretaries (CAFS) Data Sharing Projects: Phase 1: Consultation and project refinement Ongoing DSS   X X
Sexual Violence Research Ongoing Appropriation, ANROWS, Royal Commission, Melbourne Uni X X X
The Effects of Pornography on Children and Young People 2016 DSS X   X
The Gambling Behaviour Checklist 2015–2016 Swinburne University of Technology   X X
Wagering inducements and marketing 2016–2018 CQU X X X
Weighing Up the Odds: Young men, sports and gambling 2015–2017 VRGF   X X
Women’s Safety Package: Local support coordinator evaluation 2017 DSS     X
Work and Family Interactions Ongoing Appropriation X X X
Working Together to Care for Kids: The national survey of foster and relative/kinship carers 2015–2017 DSS X   X

Note: Acronyms: ABS = Australian Bureau of Statistics; AGD = Attorney-General’s Department; ANROWS = Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety; APS = Australian Psychological Society Limited; CQU = Central Queensland University; DFAT = Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; DHHS = Victorian Department of Health and Human Services; DSS = Department of Social Services; DVA = Department of Veterans’ Affairs; FACS = NSW Family and Community Services; NCVER = National Centre for Vocational Education Research; RCH = Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne; Royal Commission = Royal Commission Into the Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse; SPRC at UNSW = Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales; Uni. = University; VRGF = Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Research highlights

Australian Temperament Project

The Australian Temperament Project (ATP) has followed the development of a large group of Victorian children from their first year of life into their early thirties. With information collected over 16 data collection waves, the ATP is one of the longest running studies of its kind in Australia, and one of only a few in the world with information on three generations of family members (i.e., the young people, their parents, and now the young people’s children).

While the initial aim of the ATP was to understand the influence of child temperament on later development, the study has broadened its focus to many other aspects of development.

Publications released in 2016/17 have focused on diverse topics such as risky driving, youth violence and child maltreatment. Work also progressed on papers examining intergenerational patterns in intimate partner conflict, mental health problems among antisocial youth and problem gambling (in collaboration with the Australian Research Gambling Centre).

Elder Abuse Prevalence Scoping Study

Commencing in 2016, this study involved a scoping study for further research into the prevalence and nature of elder abuse in Australia. The study was funded by the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department, with the final report submitted by AIFS in May 2017.

The final report outlined options for achieving a nationally useful definition of elder abuse and considered the uses and limitations of existing Australian datasets and ongoing studies, together with presenting options for sampling and/or data collection strategies for a national Australian prevalence study.

The report outlined the benefits and limitations of the recommended methodological approaches and data collection strategies, and considered the feasibility, timing and costs of the potential options. It also outlined options for further targeted research relating to the experience of elder abuse.

Empowering Migrant and Refugee Women

The Empowering Migrant and Refugee Women project was commissioned by the Department of Social Services. The project aimed to explore best practice principles and key gaps in service delivery to migrant and refugee women who have been living in Australia for at least five years.

To address these aims, primary data was collected from an online survey of almost 130 service providers and semi-structured qualitative interviews from 13 service providers delivering services to migrant and refugee women.

Analysis of the survey and qualitative data was completed during the reporting period. A final report was drafted that documents the nature and types of services available to migrant women, and highlights best practice principles in service delivery and key priorities to fill the service gaps identified by service providers participating in the study. It is anticipated that the final report will be released in the second half of 2017.

Report on performance—Financial activities

Operating results

In accordance with the Australian Government net cash appropriation arrangements, AIFS incurred a deficit for the financial year 2016/17 of $166,778. This deficit is primarily due to the depreciation expense for 2016/17 of $412,121. After adjusting for this item, AIFS would have reported a surplus of $245,343.

See Table 3.3, for a summary of budgeted and actual expenses for 2016/17.

Operating revenue

The total operating revenue was $11,585,030 and consisted of the following:

  • government appropriations of $4,458,000;
  • sale of goods and rendering of services of $6,931,184;
  • other revenue of $160,725; and
  • royalties of $35,121.

Operating expenses

Total operating expenses were $11,751,808 and consisted of:

  • employee costs of $7,782,163;
  • supplier expenses of $3,519,290;
  • depreciation and amortisation of $412,121; and
  • loss on sale of assets of $38,234.
Table 3.3: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2016/17, and budgeted expenses, 2017/18.
Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy-makers, service providers, and the broader community Budget 2016/17
$’000
Actual 2016/17 $’000 Variation (column 2 – column 1) ($’000) Budget 2017/18 ($’000)
Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies        
Departmental expenses        
Departmental appropriation 12,308 11,340 (968) 12,191
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 367 412 45 534
Total for Program 1.1 12,675 11,752 (923) 12,725
Outcome 1 totals by appropriation type
Departmental expenses        
Departmental appropriation 12,308 11,340 (968) 12,191
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 367 412 45 534
Total expenses for Outcome 1 12,675 11,752 (923) 12,725
  2016/17 2016/17 2016/17 2017/18
Average staffing level1 82 67 (15) 82

Note: 1. The headcount and average staffing level are not the same measure. The headcount is the total number of employees at 30 June 2017. The average staffing level is an average over the financial year.

Balance sheet

Net asset position

The net asset position at 30 June 2017 was $1,635,577 (2016: $1,619,355).

Total assets

Total assets at 30 June 2017 were $6,004,232 (2016: $7,385,253). Financial assets decreased by $1,037,208. This decrease in financial assets was mainly due to a reduction in the amount of Section 74 receipts received at the end of June 2017. Non-financial assets decreased by $343,815. The decrease in non-financial assets is mainly due to depreciation of capital and a decrease in prepayments.

Total liabilities

Total liabilities at 30 June 2017 were $4,368,655 (2016: $5,765,898). The reduction is mainly due to a lower level of unearned revenue of $1,052,312, decreases in employee provisions of $115,220 and in payables of $229,714.

4. Management and accountability

Management and accountability is achieved with the support of the Corporate and Strategy area of the Institute.

Corporate and Strategy provides a range of services to assist the Institute to meet its goals, through the ongoing improvement and application of financial, administrative, human resources, communications and information technology policies and practices.

Accountability is met through the Institute’s internal management committee, advisory and governance committees, staff and management committees, including the Senior Leadership Group, robust reporting processes, internal and external audits, the Business Continuity Plan and policies and guidelines under the Protective Security Policy Framework.

Corporate governance

The Institute operates under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). The corporate focus throughout 2016/17 was the effective maintenance of high standards of governance, accountability and reporting in order to fulfil all PGPA requirements and build organisational capacity to achieve the Institute’s research and communication objectives. This corporate oversight is conducted through senior management committees (detailed below).

The Family Law Act 1975 sets out the Institute’s role, functions and governance arrangements. During 2016/17, the responsible minister for AIFS was the Hon. Christian Porter MP, Minister for Social Services.

Fraud control

During the financial year 2016/17, no fraud was identified. A fraud risk assessment was conducted during 2016/17 and the fraud control plan was updated in June 2017.

Annual Report 2016/17 Fraud Control Certification

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I, Anne Hollonds, Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies, hereby certify that I am satisfied that the Institute has:

  • undertaken a fraud risk assessment and updated the fraud control plan;
  • put in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and reporting mechanisms that meet the specific needs of the Institute; and
  • taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the Institute.

Anne Hollonds,
Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies
01 September 2017

Senior executive members

Ms Anne Hollonds is the current Director of the Institute and has been since September 2015. Two Deputy Directors assist the Director in leading and managing the Institute. Dr Michael Alexander has been the Acting Deputy Director (Corporate and Strategy) since January 2016. Associate Professor Daryl Higgins was the Deputy Director (Research) until February 2017. Ms Kelly Hand has been the Acting Deputy Director (Research) since that time.

Senior management committees

The Director has overall responsibility for the leadership and management of the Institute. A number of committees and groups are in place to support this function.

Internal management committees

Executive

The Executive group leads and coordinates all aspects of the research and corporate functions of the Institute. It comprises the Director and the two Deputy Directors.

Senior Leadership Group

The Senior Leadership Group comprises the Executive and Managers from the corporate and research areas. The group is a strategic leadership forum providing advice to the Director and Deputy Directors.

Advisory and governance committees

The Institute supports sound management of its accountability and ethical and legislative responsibilities through the Advisory Council, Risk Assessment and Audit Committee, and the Human Research Ethics Committee.

Advisory Council

The role of the Advisory Council is to provide high level specialist advice to the Director in relation to strategic directions for Institute research, any significant proposed changes to the research program, key performance indicators for the Institute’s research activities, and the development of future strategic and research plans. The role of the Advisory Council within the Institute is currently under review.

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee

The Risk Assessment and Audit Committee reports to the Director and plays a key role in the Institute’s corporate governance. It helps ensure effective and efficient use of resources by reviewing the performance and operations of internal controls and performance management systems. It approves the Institute’s internal audit program and advises the Executive on risk fraud compliance and performance. It also provides assurance to the Director on preparing and reviewing financial statements. An external member chairs the committee. Membership includes the two Deputy Directors and three independent members external to the Institute. The committee met four times during 2016/17, addressing a range of issues including the review of budgets.

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee members, 2016/17
  • Dennis Mihelyi (Chair), Chief Financial Officer, Fair Work Building Industry Inspectorate
  • Brian Scammell (Member), Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Group, Productivity Commission
  • Ivan Perrett (Member), Branch Manager, People and Culture, National Disability Insurance Agency (until March 2017)
  • Associate Professor Daryl Higgins (Member), Deputy Director (Research), AIFS (until February 2017)
  • Kelly Hand (Member), Acting Deputy Director (Research), AIFS (from February 2017)
  • Dr Michael Alexander (Member), Acting Deputy Director (Corporate and strategy), AIFS
  • Anne Hollonds (Observer), Director, AIFS
  • Susan Leong (Observer), Chief Finance Officer, AIFS (until December 2016)
  • Malcolm Williamson (Observer), Chief Financial Officer, AIFS (from April 2017).
Human Research Ethics Committee

The role of the Institute’s Human Research Ethics Committee is to ensure the ethical standards outlined in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, and elaborated in the Institute’s ethics statement, Ethical Issues in the Research Process (1996), are met in all research projects undertaken by the Institute.

In particular, the committee must ensure projects meet the three key principles of: respect for persons, beneficence and justice, as set down in the National Statement. The committee is registered with the Australian Health Ethics Committee, a sub-committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council.

The Ethics Committee meets to consider new project proposals, receive brief oral and written reports on ongoing projects, consider any complaints or problems that may have arisen regarding ethical issues in Institute research, and review the complaints procedures, as required. The Ethics Committee meets to consider new project proposals, receive brief oral and written reports on ongoing projects, consider any complaints or problems that may have arisen regarding ethical issues in Institute research, and review the complaints procedures, as required. The committee met three times in 2016/17 and undertook expedited considerations on three occasions, assessing 14 ethics applications for new, revised or extended research projects. The committee also has an expedited review process in place for projects that need approval between meetings of the committee.

Members of the Ethics Committee are appointed for three-year terms, with the exception of one member who has sought an extension of their appointment for a shorter term.

Human Research Ethics Committee members, 2016/17
  • Dr Duncan Ironmonger AM (Chair), BCom, MCom (Melb.); PhD (Cambridge); Department of Economics, University of Melbourne
  • Dr Richard Ingleby, MA, DPhil (Oxford); LLM (Cambridge); Visiting Professor, North China University of Technology
  • Ms Lorraine Parsons, BA (La Trobe); BSW (La Trobe); Grad. Cert. Management (Curtin)
  • Rev. John Lamont, BA (La Trobe); BTheol (United Faculty of Theology, Ormond College)
  • Dr Kerreen Reiger, BA (Hons) (Melb.); PhD (La Trobe); Honorary Associate, College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce, La Trobe University
  • Dr Sarah Wise, BA (Hons) (Melb.), MA, PhD (Melb.); Good Childhood Fellow, Social Work, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne/Berry Street Childhood Institute
  • Ian Claridge, BA, Grad. Dip. Special Ed., Grad. Dip. Ed. Leadership; Associate National College for Leadership, Education Consultant/Accredited Executive Coach
  • Victoria Triggs, BSciEd (Melb.), Grad. Dip. Ed. Admin. (Melb.), Williamson Fellow (Leadership Victoria), Grad. Dip. Australian Institute of Company Directors.
Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) Expert Advisory Group

The Expert Advisory Group of the AGRC provides advice to the Director (in their capacity as Director of AGRC), in relation to:

  • strategic directions and research plans and programs for undertaking or commissioning research into, or producing data and statistics about, gambling; and
  • strategies for increasing the capability and capacity of researchers to conduct research into, or produce data and statistics about, gambling.

The Expert Advisory Group consists of the Director and at least seven, but no more than 11, other members.

Australian Gambling Research Centre Expert Advisory Group, 2016/17
  • Professor Richard Chisholm AM (Chair), Adjunct Professor, ANU College of Law
  • Professor Max Abbott, Director, Gambling and Addictions Research Centre; and Pro Vice-Chancellor, Auckland University of Technology
  • Ashley Gordon, Manager, NSW Aboriginal Safe Gambling Services
  • Dr Ralph Lattimore, Assistant Commissioner, Productivity Commission
  • Professor Alison McClelland, Productivity Commission
  • Dr Mark Zirnsak, Director, Justice and International Mission Unit, Uniting Church in Australia Synod Office (Victoria & Tasmania)
  • Linda Woo, Executive Director, Office of Regulatory Policy in Queensland’s Department of Justice and Attorney-General
  • Ms Anne Hollonds, AIFS and AGRC Director.

Corporate and statutory reporting

During 2016/17, the Institute continued to refine and strengthen its planning processes in order to make its reporting outputs more robust, including ongoing improvements to its budget development, review and monitoring processes. These initiatives continue to bring together a range of corporate and communications priorities, and have contributed to robust compliance standards and reporting performance against outcomes.

In August 2016, the Institute published its second Corporate (Agency) Plan for 2016/17 to 2019/20 as required under the PGPA Act. The Institute has spent much of 2016/17 implementing its strategic priorities and the progress of that work is reflected in the latest Agency Plan for 2017/18 to 2020/21, which was published in August 2017. The current plan focuses on three priorities of creating, connecting and communicating knowledge, as well as activating greater organisational capability through a range of internal initiatives. The Institute expects to continue to refine its strategic priorities over the course of 2017/18.

In 2016/17, all statutory reports were completed and tabled in a timely manner as required.

Risk management

The Institute refreshed its Risk Management Policy and Framework in September 2016, and continues to monitor and improve its approach to risk management, including participating in the annual Risk Management Benchmarking Survey conducted by Comcover.

Project management

In 2015/16, the Institute instigated a major review of its financial and management accounting processes. The review recommended that AIFS implement a more systematic approach to its project management processes through the adoption of an agency-wide project management tool and associated processes. By doing so, AIFS expects to be able to generate more accurate and timely analysis from its management accounting activities through a more consistent and sharper focus on project management principles. In addition, the new systematic project management approach is expected to allow risk reporting to be more easily embedded in scheduled projected reporting, as well as reduce the resourcing required in relation to the management of project budgets.

Although this project has taken longer than initially anticipated, the Institute is now well advanced in implementing this new project management approach, with much of the “proof of concept” activities completed in 2016/17. The Institute expects to complete the implementation during 2017/18.

Internal audit

During 2016/17, three reviews were undertaken by the internal auditors, namely reviews of our payroll processes, procurement practices and compliance to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and related legislation, together with a new fraud risk assessment. All reviews confirmed that the Institute has maintained, in all material respects, effective control procedures.

The Institute currently engages BDO East Coast Partnership to provide internal audits.

Business continuity

The Institute’s Business Continuity Plan was reviewed and updated during 2016/17, with the next major review scheduled for 2017/18. The plan provides the necessary guidelines to enable the Institute to:

  • take action to prevent potential disruption to the business;
  • take appropriate action to safeguard staff and property in the event of a crisis;
  • plan and effectively manage the recovery of operations of the business to a satisfactory level;
  • plan and manage the resumption of normal business operations in permanent premises with its usual systems and staff; and
  • plan and manage significant staff reductions in the event of a possible pandemic illness or other threat to business continuity that may be of a protracted nature.

Protective Security Policy Framework

The Institute has continued to implement and adhere to the Australian Government Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF), in accordance with guidelines published by Attorney-General's Department (AGD). As at 30 June 2017, the Institute was fully compliant with all 36 mandatory requirements of the PSPF.

Ethical standards

The Institute continues to take actions designed to integrate the APS Values into the organisational culture and the day-to-day work of all employees. The obligations of employees to uphold the APS Values and abide by the APS Code of Conduct are:

  • promoted in staff induction and training;
  • applied to human resource management processes, including individual performance plans; and
  • reflected in human resource policies and procedures, which are made available to all employees on the Institute intranet.

The Institute was not subject to any decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner in 2016/17.

External scrutiny

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) performs an annual statutory audit of the Institute’s financial statements. In addition, an independent contractor conducts a program of internal audit reviews (BDO East Coast Partnership). The outcomes of all audits are presented to the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee and plans developed for the implementation of recommendations and the ongoing monitoring of resultant actions for improved processes.

In 2016/17, the Institute was not subject to reports by the Auditor-General, parliamentary committees or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

The Institute does not have statutory administrative decision-making powers and was not subject to any judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals in 2016/17.

Management of human resources

Employee skills and qualifications

The Institute is fortunate to have employees with a great diversity of skills, knowledge and experience. This ranges from research knowledge in multiple disciplines—including social science, psychology, family law, child and adolescent development, criminology, demography, economics, statistics and survey design—to management skills such as commercial contract negotiation, project management, financial and human resource management, information technology and communications. This diversity of knowledge and expertise exemplifies one of the benefits of working in a small organisation. These skills are known and as such can be used across a number of facets of the Institute’s operations.

Figures 4.1 and 4.2 show, respectively, the highest qualifications gained by Institute employees overall and by those employed in the research area.

Figure 4.1: Employee qualifications as at 30 June 2017

Figure 4.1:Employee qualifications as at 30 June 2017

Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications as at 30 June 2017

Figure 4.2:Research employee qualifications as at 30 June 2017

Workforce planning

In 2016/17, the Institute continued to develop its capacity to plan and respond to changing workforce needs. Building capacity and other workforce issues, including increasing the diversity of the workforce, will continue to be an area of focus in 2017/18.

Staff engagement, participation and development

The Institute recognises the vital contribution our people make to the achievement of our purpose and the importance of staff being engaged with their work, participating in the workplace and developing professionally.

Staff Advisory Group

The Staff Advisory Group was established to provide a forum for discussion between management and employees on workplace culture and engagement matters. Members provide constructive feedback to assist in improving employee experiences and work together to develop action plans for agreed focus areas.

Workplace Relations Committee

The Workplace Relations Committee provides a forum for management and employees to discuss matters relating to the Enterprise Agreement as well as the workplace in general. The committee comprises management and employee representatives. Employees are encouraged to contribute their ideas or raise any concerns regarding their workplace with their representatives.

Work Health and Safety Committee

The Work Health and Safety Committee facilitates consultation and discussion between management and employees regarding health and safety matters in the workplace. Committee meetings are held at least quarterly for the planning and promotion of health and safety practices and principles in the workplace, and provide an effective forum for staff to raise particular health and safety issues.

Learning and development

The primary focus of learning and development activities is to ensure that the Institute has the organisational capability to meet operational objectives, both now and in the future.

During the year, staff development focused on a range of interpersonal, leadership, professional workplace and wellbeing topics. The effectiveness of the training provided was evaluated in the performance reviews conducted between managers and individuals.

The Institute also continues to provide professional development opportunities for employees via professional memberships, attendance at conferences, and support for formal study.

Statistics on staffing

As at 30 June 2017, there were 84 staff—20 males and 64 females—employed at the Institute under the Public Service Act 1999, excluding the Director.

Tables 4.1 and 4.2 present profiles of Institute staff by gender and type of employment at 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2016 respectively. As Table 4.1 indicates, at 30 June 2017 the Institute had 47% of staff in ongoing positions and 53% of staff in non-ongoing positions. This represents an increase in non-ongoing staff of 12 percentage points compared to the previous year. Table 4.3 describes staff by classification level, gender and type of employment as at 30 June 2017.

Table 4.1: Staffing overview—Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2017
  Ongoing Non-ongoing Totals
Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time
Male 7 1 10 2 20
Female 15 17 14 18 64
Total number 22 18 24 20 84
% of all staff 26 21 29 24 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to the Institute on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis.

Table 4.2: Staffing overview—Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2016
  Ongoing Non-ongoing Totals
Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time
Male 8 1 8 4 21
Female 19 16 9 10 54
Total number 27 17 17 14 75
% of all staff 36 23 23 18 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to the Institute on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis.

Table 4.3: Staffing overview—Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff,  by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2017
  Ongoing Non-ongoing  
Classification AIFS classification / salary range ($) Male Female Male Female Total number % of all staff
Senior Executive Service (SES) Band 1 SES Band 1 1 1 0 0 2 2
Executive Level (EL) 2 AIFS EL 2 1 10 2 2 15 18
Executive Level 1 AIFS EL 1 5 10 3 5 23 27
APS 6 AIFS Band 5–6 1 7 1 12 21 25
APS 5 AIFS Band 5–6 0 2 4 8 14 17
APS 4 AIFS Band 3–4 0 1 2 3 6 7
APS 3 AIFS Band 3–4 0 0 0 2 2 2
APS 2 AIFS Band 1–2 0 1 0 0 1 1
APS 1 AIFS Band 1–2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total number   8 32 12 32 84  
% of all staff   10 38 14 38   100

Note: Seventeen employees on higher duties were counted at the higher duties level. Excludes employees engaged to provide services to the Institute on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis.

Employees who identify as Indigenous

As at 30 June 2017 the Institute had no ongoing or non-ongoing employees who identified as Indigenous, the same as at 30 June 2016.

Individual and collective agreements

Details of the number of staff covered by the Institute’s Enterprise Agreement or a Section 24(1) determination at 30 June 2017 are shown in Table 4.4.

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2017
Type of agreement No. of staff
Enterprise Agreement1 81
Section 24(1) determination 3

Note: 1. Three EL 2 employees covered by the Enterprise Agreement have been provided with Section 24(1) determinations to supplement the provisions of the Enterprise Agreement. Excludes employees engaged to provide services to the Institute on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis.

Performance pay

Eligible EL 2 employees on Section 24(1) determinations may qualify for a performance bonus of up to 15% if they achieve a performance rating of fully effective or above. Table 4.5 outlines performance payment information for the 2016 performance cycle.

Table 4.5: Performance pay for 2016 performance cycle
Level Number Aggregated amount Average Minimum Maximum
EL 2 1 $7,704 $7,704 $7,704 $7,704

Assets management

The Institute maintains a detailed and effective assets register. Assets management is not a significant aspect of the strategic business of the Institute.

Purchasing

All purchasing is carried out in line with the requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Accountable Authority’s Instructions and Financial Guidelines, and in keeping with the core principles of ethical, efficient, effective and economical conduct. Templates covering all aspects of purchasing and approval have been developed and are used consistently.

All procurements in excess of $10,000 are reported in AusTender, and contracts in excess of $100,000 are included in Senate Order 192 reporting.

Consultants

The Institute’s core business, to conduct research and communicate the findings, can require the use of consultant expertise. Consultants are generally engaged when particular specialist expertise is necessary and sufficiently skilled expertise is not immediately available in-house, or independent advice is required.

The services provided by new and continuing consultants in the reporting period included provision of research reports, the review and audit of financial activities, human resources and business process analyses, as well as media relations services.

Processes for the engagement of consultants were consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Financial Guidelines. As with all procurement, the priority in the engagement of consultants is to obtain value for money. Competitive processes are used for the selection of consultants, and the Accountable Authority’s Instructions contain guidelines for the approval of expenditure.

Consistent with the policy of including trend data in annual reports, expenditure on consultancy contracts over the three most recent financial years is listed in Table 4.6.

Table 4.6: Expenditure on consultancy contracts over 2014/15 to 2016/17 (incl. GST)
Financial year Consultancy contract expenditure
2014/15 $287,975
2015/16 $267,534
2016/17 $386,888

During 2016/17, 13 new consultancy contracts were entered into (including those to the value of less than $10,000), involving total actual expenditure of $201,518 (incl. GST). In addition, four ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the year, involving total actual expenditure of $185,370 (incl. GST). Expenditure for the year totalled $386,888 (incl. GST).

The Annual Report contains information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies over $10,000 is available on the AusTender website.

Commissioning bodies

During the 2016/17 financial year, the following organisations commissioned projects from the Institute:

  • Attorney-General’s Department
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics
  • Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety Ltd
  • Australian Psychological Society Limited
  • Central Queensland University
  • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • Department of Human Services
  • Department of Social Services
  • Department of Veterans’ Affairs
  • KPMG
  • Mitchell Institute
  • Monash University
  • National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER)
  • NSW Department of Family and Community Services
  • RMIT Training Pty Ltd
  • Royal Commission into the Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse
  • Swinburne University of Technology
  • University of New South Wales (Social Policy Research Centre)
  • Victorian Department of Health and Human Services
  • Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Australian National Audit Office access clauses

The Institute’s contract templates contain standard clauses to provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises. All contracts let during the reporting period contained these standard clauses.

Exempt contracts

The Institute has not entered into any contracts or standing offers above the reporting threshold value of $10,000 that have been exempted from publication in AusTender.

Procurement initiatives to support small business

The Institute supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. The Institute’s procurement practices support small and medium enterprises (SMEs) by using the following:

  • the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low-risk procurements valued under $200,000;
  • Australian Industry Participation Plans in whole-of-government procurement where applicable;
  • the Small Business Engagement Principles (outlined in the government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda), such as communicating in clear, simple language and presenting information in an accessible format; and
  • electronic systems or other processes used to facilitate on-time payment performance, including the use of payment cards.

SME and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

5. Financial statements

Due to their size and format the Financial statements are only available in PDF.

PDF iconFinancial statements (PDF, 1MB)

If you require an accessible version of the statements please contact us and we will endeavour to provide the content you need in a format you can use.

Appendix A: Other mandatory information

Work health and safety

The Institute is committed to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace, and meeting its responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

Advertising and market research

No payments of $13,000 or greater (inclusive of GST) were made for the purposes of advertising and market research expenditure, as described in section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. The Institute did not conduct any advertising campaigns during 2016/17.

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Institute management and staff are committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development. In accordance with good practice, the Institute always endeavours to turn off non-essential lighting and appliances.

The following details the Institute's environmental impacts, and the initiatives staff have taken to minimise them.

In 2016/17, electricity consumption within our tenancy (causing emissions to the air and use of resources) was reduced by 19% from 2015/16. This continues the reductions achieved in recent years and is most likely due to variations in employee numbers combined with energy efficient practices, such as staff shutting down their computers at the end of the day, encouraging staff to switch off lights when not needed and continuing the removal of excess lighting.

The Institute uses 20% wind power, thus reducing emissions and resource use.

All office equipment conforms to environmental standards.

Adverse effects due to transport (causing emissions to the air and use of resources) are mostly due to domestic airline flights. Staff are encouraged to use webinar, video and teleconference facilities where possible. Webinars continue to grow in popularity and are increasingly being used to replace seminar presentations, meaning many more people can participate without needing to travel to the Institute to hear them.

Paper consumption (use of natural resources) is minimised by using recycled paper and ensuring that the office printers default to using both sides of the paper. Paper use in 2016/17 (number of printer/copier impressions) decreased by 27%. This continues the 24% decrease in total during the previous two years, after a 16% increase in 2013/14. As with electricity consumption, these fluctuations are likely to be due to variations in employee numbers over the years combined with the introduction of swipe card access and the gradual transition to digital working in line with the Australian Government's digital transition and digital continuity 2020 policies.

Waste generation (resource waste and emissions to the air) is reduced by recycling paper, cardboard, glass, plastics and metals.

Water consumption (use of natural resources) has been minimised by using water-saving facilities.

Disability reporting

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007/08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission's State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available from the Commission's website. Since 2010/11, departments and agencies have not been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by a new National Disability Strategy 2010-20, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with a disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with a disability are faring. The first of these reports was published in late 2014 (see the Department of Social Services website).

Information Publication Scheme

Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements. The Institute complies with this requirement.

No requests were made of the Institute this year for information under the FOI Act.

Contact details

FOI Contact Officer, Australian Institute of Family Studies, Level 20, 485 La Trobe Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

Email: aifs-foi@aifs.gov.au
Phone: (03) 9214 7888
Fax: (03) 9214 7839

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2016/17
    Actual available appropriation for 2016/17 Payments made 2016/17
$ (b)
Balance remaining 2016/17
$ (a) - (b)
Ordinary annual services1   $ (a) Payments made 2016/17  
Departmental appropriation2   16,297,093 13,021,482 3,275,611
Total   16,297,093 13,021,482 3,275,611
Total ordinary annual services A 16,297,093 13,021,482 3,275,611
Other services3        
Departmental non-operating        
Equity injections   - - -
Total   - - -
Total other services B - - -
Total available annual appropriations and payments   16,297,093 13,021,482 3,275,611
Special appropriations        
Total special appropriations C - - -
Special accounts4        
Total special accounts D - - -
Total resourcing and payments A+B+C+D   16,297,093 13,021,482 3,275,611
Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts through annual appropriations   - - -
Total net resourcing and payments for AIFS   16,297,093 13,021,482 3,275,611

Notes:

1. Appropriation Act (No.1) 2016/17 and Appropriation Act (No.3) 2016/17 [and Appropriation Act (No. 5) 2016/17 if necessary]. This may also include prior year departmental appropriation and section 74 Retained Revenue Receipts.
2. Includes an amount of $0.183 million in 2016/17 for the Departmental Capital Budget. For accounting purposes this amount has been designated as "contributions by owners".
3.  Appropriation Act (No.2) 2016/17 and Appropriation Act (No.4) 2016/17 [and  Appropriation Act (No. 6) 2016/17  if necessary].
4. Does not include "Special Public Money" held in accounts like Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts (SOETM).

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2016/17
Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy-makers, service providers, and the broader community Budget 11 2016/17
$'000
Actual expenses 2016/17
$'000 (b)
Variation 2016/17
$'000 (a) - (b)
Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies      
Departmental expenses      
Departmental appropriation2 12,308 11,340 968
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 367 412 (45)
Total for Program 1.1 12,675 11,752 923
  2016/17 2016/17 2016/17
Average staffing level (number) 82 67 (15)

Notes:

1. Full year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2016/17 Budget at Additional Estimates.
2. Departmental Appropriation combines Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Acts Nos. 1, 3 and 5) and Retained Revenue Receipts under section 74 of the PGPA Act 2013.

Appendix C: AIFS publications, seminars and presentations 2016/17

The following are the research publications, presentations and other outputs prepared by AIFS staff during 2016/17.

Publications

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2016). Annual report 2015-2016. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2016). The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2016). Family Matters98.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2017). Family Matters99.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2017). Current approaches to preventing and responding to sexual assault: A rapid evidence assessment. Sydney: Women NSW.

Australian Institute of Family Studies, Multicultural Marketing and Management, & Colmar Brunton. (2016). Building a New Life in Australia, the Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants: Data users guide. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baker, K., Maguire, B., Daraganova, G., & Sipthorp, M. (2016). Using My School data in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC Technical Paper No. 16). Canberra: National Centre for Longitudinal Data.

Baxter, J. A. (2016). Diversity, complexity and change in children's households. In AIFS (Ed.), The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015 (pp. 41-70). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J. A. (2017). Stay-at-home dads (AIFS Facts Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J. A., Hand, K., & Sweid, R. (2016). Flexible child care and Australian parents' work and care decision-making (AIFS Research Report No. 37). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J. A., & Warren, D. (2016). Grandparents in their young grandchildren's lives. In AIFS (Ed.), The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015 (pp. 13-40). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bray, J. R., Gray, M., Hand, K., & Katz, I. (2016). Social worker assessed vulnerable income management. Australian Journal of Social Issues51(4), 469-485.

Campo, M., & Commerford, J. (2016). Supporting young people leaving out-of-home care (CFCA Paper No. 41). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Campo, M., & Smart, J. (2017). LGBTIQ+ communities: Glossary of common terms (CFCA Resource Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Carson, R., Kaspiew, R., Dunstan, J., Qu, L., Horsfall, B. et al. (2016). Identifying and responding to family violence and child safety concerns: Findings from the AIFS evaluation of the 2012 family violence amendments. Family Matters98, 7-15.

Closing the Gap Clearinghouse. (2016). Family violence prevention programs in Indigenous communities (Resource Sheet No. 37). Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare & Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Commerford, J., & Robinson, E. (2016). Supported playgroups for parents and children: The evidence for their benefits (CFCA Paper No. 40). Melbourne: Child Family Community Australia information exchange, Australian Institute of Family Studies.

De Vaus, D., Gray, M., Qu, L. & Stanton, D. (2017). The economic consequences of divorce in six OECD countries. Australian Journal of Social Issues52(2), 180-199.

Delfabbro, P., Thomas, A., & Armstrong, A. R. (2016). Observable indicators and behaviours for the identification of problem gamblers in venue environments. Journal of Behavioral Addiction5(3), 1-10.

Delfabbro, P., Thomas, A., & Armstrong, A. (2017). Gender differences in the presentation of observable risk indicators of problem gambling. Journal of Gambling Studies. Advance online publication.

Dickins, M., & Thomas, A. (2016). Gambling in culturally and linguistically diverse communities in Australia (AGRC Discussion Paper No. 7). Melbourne: Australian Gambling Research Centre, Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Doidge, J. C., Higgins, D. J., Delfabbro, P., Edwards, B., Vassallo, S. et al. (2017). Economic predictors of child maltreatment in an Australian population-based birth cohort. Child Abuse and Neglect64, 47-60.

Doidge, J. C., Higgins, D. J., Delfabbro, P., & Segal, L. (2017). Risk factors for child maltreatment in an Australian population-based birth cohort. Children and Youth Services Review72, 14-25.

Edwards, B., & Homel, J. (2016). Demographic, attitudinal and psychosocial factors associated with childhood immunisation. In AIFS (Ed.), The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015 (pp. 71-90). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Edwards, B., O'Connor, M., Smart, D., Jessup, K., Romaniuk, H. et al. (2016). Strengthening the evidence base for the impact of early childhood education. Report for the Australian Government Department of Education and Training.

Hand, K. (2017). Working out what works for families: Evidence and the Australian child and family service system. Family Matters99, 4-7.

Herrenkohl, T. I., Leeb, R. T., & Higgins, D. J. (2016). The public health model of child maltreatment prevention. Trauma Violence & Abuse17(4), 363-365.

Higgins, D. J. (2016). AIFS Conference 2016: Keynotes and Q&A session. Family Matters98, 74-75.

Higgins, D. J., Kaufman, K., & Erooga, M. (2016). How can child welfare and youth-serving organisations keep children safe? Developing Practice: The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal44, 48-64.

Hollonds, A. (2016). Director's report. Family Matters98, 2-3.

Hollonds, A. (2017). Director's report. Family Matters99, 2-3.

Homel, J., & Edwards, B. (2016). Using Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC Technical Paper No. 17). Canberra: National Centre for Longitudinal Data.

Humphreys, C., & Campo, M. (2017). Fathers who use violence: Options of safe practice where there is ongoing contact with children (CFCA Paper No. 43). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Kaspiew, R., & Carson, R. (2016). Context: The Responding to Family Violence study's discussion of Family Law DOORS. Family Matters98, 42.

Kaspiew, R., & Carson, R. (2016). From the Editors. Family Matters98, 4-6.

Kaspiew, R., Carson, R., & Rhoades, H. (2016). Elder abuse in Australia. Family Matters98, 64-73.

Kaspiew, R., Horsfall, B., Qu, L., Nicholson, J., Humphrey, C. et al. (2017). Domestic and family violence and parenting: Mixed method insights into impact and support needs. Final report (ANROWS Horizon Research Report Issue No. 04/17). Sydney: ANROWS.

Kaspiew, R., & Qu, L. (2016). Property division after separation: Recent research evidence. Australian Journal of Family Law30, 1-27.

Kaufman, K., Erooga, M., Stewart, K., Zatkin, J., McConnell, E. et al. (2016). Risk profiles for institutional child sexual abuse: A literature review. Sydney: Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Kenny, P., Morley, S., & Higgins, D. J. (2017). Forced Adoption Support Services: Establishing and building networks. Canberra: Department of Social Services.

Knight, K., & Dean, A. (2016). Stronger communities, safer children: Findings from recent Australian research on the importance of community in keeping children safe (CFCA Resource Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Lewig, K., & McLean, S. (2016). Caring for our frontline child protection workforce (CFCA Paper No. 42). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Mathews, B., Walsh, K., Dunne, M., Katz, I., Arney, F. et al. (2016). Scoping study for research into prevalence of child sexual abuse in Australia. Sydney: Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

McLean, S. (2016). Children's attachment needs in the context of out-of-home care (CFCA Practitioner Resource). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Merkouris, S., Thomas, A., Shandley, K., Rodda, S., Oldenhof, E. et al. (2016). An update on gender differences in the characteristics associated with problem gambling: A systematic review. Current Addiction Reports3(3), 254-267.

Moloney, L., Smyth, B., Richardson, N., & Capper, S. (2016). Understanding parenting disputes after separation (AIFS Research Report No. 36). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Moore, T. (2017). Protection through participation: Involving children in child-safe organisations (CFCA Practitioner Resource). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Morley, S. (2017). Practitioners on evidence. Family Matters99, 30-35.

Muir, S., & Dean, A. (2017). Evaluating the outcomes of programs for Indigenous families and communities (CFCA Practitioner Resource). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Price-Robertson, R., Olsen, G., Francis, H., Obradovic, A., & Morgan, B. (2016). Supporting recovery in families affected by parental mental illness (CFCA Practitioner Resource). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L., Knight, K., & Higgins D. (2016). Same-sex couple families in Australia (AIFS Facts Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Quadara, A. (2016). Principles of trauma-informed approaches to child sexual abuse: A discussion paper. Sydney: Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Quadara, A., Stathopoulos, M., & Carson, R. (2016). Family relationships and the disclosure of institutional child sexual abuse. Sydney: Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., & Thomas, A. (2017). Responsible gambling codes of conduct: Lack of harm minimisation intervention in the context of venue self-regulation. Addiction Research & Theory. Advance online publication.

Robinson, E. (2017). The Expert Panel Project: What have we learned to date? Family Matters99, 36-40.

Rodda, S., Lubman, D., & Dowling, N. (2016). Online and on-demand support for people impacted by problem gambling: The potential for e-mental health interventions (AGRC Discussion Paper No. 6). Melbourne: Australian Gambling Research Centre at the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Rodda, S., Lubman, D., & Dowling, N. (2017). Online support needs and experiences of family members affected by problem gambling. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Scott, D. A., Lonne, B., & Higgins, D. J. (2016). Public health models for preventing child maltreatment: Applications from the field of injury prevention. Trauma Violence & Abuse17(4), 408-419.

Smart, D., Daraganova, G., Edwards, B., & Zhang, G. (2017) Scoping Report on Commonwealth and State/Territory data sharing priorities, activities and opportunities. Report prepared for the Department of Social Services.

Smart, J. (2017). How to develop a program logic for planning and evaluation. Melbourne: Child Family Community Australia, Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Smart, J. (2017). What is community development? (CFCA Resource Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Stathopoulos, M., & Jenkinson, R. Informing service responses to co-occurring complex needs. Advances in Dual Diagnosis10(1), 5-12.

Strazdins, L., Baxter, J. A., & Li, J. (2017). Long hours and longings: Australian children's views of fathers' work - family time. Journal of Marriage and Family79(4), 965-982.

Vasiliadis, S., & Thomas, A. (2017). Recovery agency and informal recovery pathways from gambling problems. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. Advance online publication.

Warren, D. (2016). Parents' choices of primary school. In AIFS (Ed.), The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015 (pp. 153-172). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., O'Connor, M., Smart, D., & Edwards, B. (2016). A critical review of the early childhood literature. Canberra: Dept. of Education and Training.

Warren, D., & Yu, M. (2016). Pubertal status and emotional, school and social functioning. In AIFS (Ed.), The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015 (pp. 126-152). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Weston, R., & Qu, L. (2016). Attitudes towards intergenerational support (Australian Family Trends No. 11). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Whitehouse, G., Baird, M., Brennan, D., & Baxter, J.A. (2016). Australia country note. In A. Koslowski, S. Blum, & P. Moss (Eds.), 12th international review of leave policies and related research 2016 (pp. 45-56). London: International Network on Leave Policies and Related Research.

Yu, M., & Baxter, J. A. (2016). Australian children's screen time and participation in extracurricular activities. In AIFS (Ed.), The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2015 (pp. 99-125). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Yucel, M., & Baxter, J. A. (2017). Neuroscience in gambling policy and treatment: An interdisciplinary perspective. The Lancet Psychiatry4(6), 501-506.

Updated CFCA resource sheets

  • Child abuse and neglect statistics (October 2016)
  • Child protection and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (September 2016)
  • Children in care (October 2016)
  • Children's commissioners and guardians (November 2016)
  • Corporal punishment: Key issues (March 2017)
  • Risk and protective factors for child abuse and neglect (May 2017)
  • The economic costs of child abuse and neglect (September 2016)
  • The prevalence of child abuse and neglect (April 2017) 

Seminars and webinars

AIFS Seminar Series

John Bynner, Emeritus Professor at University College London Institute of Education. Longitudinal and life course study: The family policy connection, 28 October 2016.

Christine Skinner, Reader in Social Policy, University of York, UK; Kay Cook, Senior Research Fellow, RMIT University. What difference do child support payments make to lone mother poverty?, 14 December 2016.

Tiina Lämsä, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. Innovative methods for studying children's everyday life, 31 March 2017.

Angela Rintoul, Research Fellow, AIFS; Professor Laurie Brown, University of Canberra. Responsible gambling codes of conduct: What purpose do they serve?, 8 June 2017.

Adam Rowland, Executive Manager at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data, Department of Social Services. What next for Australia's longitudinal studies?, 22 June 2017.

CFCA Webinar Series

Fiona Harley, Deputy Executive Director of Mallee Family Care; Jon Myer, Consultant at Social Ventures Australia Consulting. Building a better outcomes framework for families: A story from the Mallee, 19 July 2016.

Rhys Price-Robertson, PhD candidate at Monash University; Angela Obradovic, mental health practitioner at Children of Parents with a Mental Illness (COPMI); Gemma Olsen, lived experience practitioner. Placing family at the centre of mental health recovery, 11 August 2016.

Daryl Higgins, former Deputy Director (Research) at the Australian Institute of Family Studies. How can child welfare and youth-serving organisations keep children safe?, 15 September 2016.

Rachel Carson, Research Fellow at the Australian Institute of Family Studies; Melanie Joosten, Research Officer at the National Ageing Research Institute; Anita Frayman, elder mediator, facilitator and aged care consultant; Gary Ferguson of Seniors Rights Victoria. Elder abuse: Recent research and effective responses, 24 October 2016.

Sara McLean, Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Child Protection. Children's attachment needs in the context of out-of-home care, 16 November 2016.

Tim Moore, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Child Protection Studies, Australian Catholic University. Protection through participation: Involving children in child-safe organisations, 8 December 2016.

Sharon Barnes, Director of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Unit at Ipsos Australia; Kylie Brosnan, Director of Public Affairs at Ipsos Queensland. Measuring outcomes in programs for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander families and communities, 15 March 2017.

Nadine Liddy, National Coordinator of the Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network Australia; Heather Stewart, formerly of the Centre for Multicultural Youth; Pilar Rioseco, Senior Research Officer at the Australian Institute of Family Studies; John De Maio, Research Fellow at the Australian Institute of Family Studies. Supporting young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds: Good practice and measuring settlement outcomes, 23 March 2017.

Louise Cooper, Counselling Psychologist and Child and Family Practitioner at Drummond Street Services; Ari Dunphy, intern practitioner at Drummond Street Services. Working with gender diverse young people and their families, 26 April 2017.

Leah Bromfield, Deputy Director of the Australian Centre for Child Protection; Jonathon Main, Executive General Manager Policy and Programs at Relationships Australia South Australia. Strengthening what works for children: Aligning target group, theory of change and program components to outcomes, 24 May 2017.

Angela Rintoul, Research Fellow at the Australian Gambling Research Centre; Professor Laurie Brown, Deputy Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis (IGPA), Convenor of the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) at the University of Canberra, and a recovering addictive poker machine gambler. Responsible gambling codes of conduct: What purpose do they serve?, 8 June 2017.

Presentations

Armstrong, A., Yu, M., Thomas, A., & Vassallo, S. (2016, July). All in the family: Intergenerational gambling participation and problems in the Australian Temperament Project. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Bryant, R., Hunt, G., & Baxter, J. A. (2016, July). Young people not fully engaged in employment or education: Five years on. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Campo, M., & Hand, K. (2016, July). Family involvement in Australian Defence Force member rehabilitation. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2016, July). Parent's views of the family law system. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2016, September). Key findings of the Evaluation of the 2012 family violence amendments. Paper presented at the Monash University JD and LLM Program, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2016, October). Key findings of the Evaluation of the 2012 family violence amendments. Paper presented at the Northern NSW Family Law Conference, Lismore, NSW.

Carson, R. (2016, November). Towards a better understanding of elder abuse - the need for a national prevalence study of elder abuse. Paper presented at the Australian Association of Gerontology Conference, Canberra.

Carson, R. (2017, June). Separated families in Australia: Characteristics pathways outcomes. Paper presented at the Greater Newcastle Family Law Pathways Network 2017 Conference, Newcastle, NSW.

Commerford, J., & Robinson, E. (2016, July). Supported playgroups: Building an evidence base. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Daraganova, G. (2016, October). Self-harm and suicidal behaviour of 14-15 year olds. Paper presented at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data Conference, Canberra.

Daraganova, G., Edwards, B., & Forrest, W. (2016, October). Intergenerational effect of deployment: Findings from the Vietnam Veterans' Family Study. Paper presented at the Australasian Military Medicine Association Conference, Melbourne.

Daraganova, G., Forrest, W., Edwards, B., & Heggie, K. (2016, July). A study of health and social issues in Vietnam Veterans' sons and daughters. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Daraganova, G., Harvey, J., & Hodson, S. (2016, October). Transition and Wellbeing Research Programme: Impact of military services on families. Paper presented at the Australasian Military Medicine Association Conference, Melbourne.

Daraganova, G., & Hodson, S. (2016, October). The Family Wellbeing Study: Impact of military services on families. Paper presented at the Australasian Military Medicine Association Conference, Melbourne.

De Maio, J., Rioseco, P., & Hollonds, A. (2017, March). Humanitarian migrants' English language, education and employment outcomes. Panel discussion presented at the Department of Social Services, Canberra.

De Maio, J., Silbert. M., Warren, D., & Edwards, B. (2016, July). Stability and changes in labour force participation among a cohort of newly arrived humanitarian migrants. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Dickins, M., & Thomas, A. C. (2016, July). When is gambling a game? Describing and exploring simulated gambling. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Dickins, M., & Thomas, A. C. (2016, July). When is gambling a game? Describing and exploring simulated gambling. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation lunchtime learning series, Melbourne.

Dunstan, J. (2016, July). A matter of safety: Concerns of separated parents in the context of a changing family law system. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Edwards, B. (2016, October). "Big data" and longitudinal surveys: Is the LSAC an exemplar of a "new wave" of longitudinal studies? Paper presented at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data Conference, Canberra. 

Edwards, B. (2016, October). Building a New Life in Australia, The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants: Cohort overview and education and labour force participation following arrival to Australia. Paper presented at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data Conference, Canberra. 

Edwards, B. (2016, October). Building a New Life in Australia, The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants: Cohort overview and education and labour force participation following arrival to Australia. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Annual Conference, Bamberg, Germany.

Edwards, B., Daraganova, G., & Vassallo, S. (2016, November). Growing Up in Australia. Paper presented at the 2016 Psychology Week Forum, NSW Parliament House, Sydney.

Edwards, B., De Maio, J., Rioseco, P., & Silbert, M. (2016, October). Education and labour force participation in newly arrived refugees. Paper presented at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data Conference, Canberra.

Edwards, B., Forrest, W., & Daraganova, G. (2016, October). Depression and suicide among the children of war veterans: The intergenerational consequences of going to war. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Annual Conference, Bamberg, Germany.

Edwards, B., & Homel, J. (2016, July). The role of parent attitudes and socio-demographic factors in partial immunisation and non-immunisation in an Australian birth cohort. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Forrest, W., Edwards, B., & Daraganova, G., & Heggie, K. (2016, July). Findings from a study of mortality patterns of Vietnam Veteran families. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Forrest, W., Edwards, B., & Daraganova, G. (2016, October). The intergenerational effects of parental military service: War as a determinant of unequal educational opportunities. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Annual Conference, Bamberg, Germany.

Hand, K., & Baxter, J. A. (2016, July). What does access to flexible child care really mean? Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Hand, K., & Nelson, A. (2016, July). "Who cares?" Income support exits among young Australians not in any education who receive carer and parenting payments: Quantitative enquiry using income support administrative data from 1999 to 2014. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Heggie, K., Forrest, W., Edwards, B., & Daraganova, G. (2016, July). General introduction and findings of the Vietnam Veterans Family Study. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Higgins, D. J., (2016, September). How can child welfare and youth-serving organisations keep children safe? Paper presented at the CFCA Webinar Series, Melbourne.

Higgins, D. J. (2016, November). Preventing child abuse: The role of technology, organisations, families and communities. Paper presented at the First National Forum on Preventing the Sexual Exploitation of Children on the Internet and Through Other Technological Means, Saudi Arabia.

Higgins, D. J. (2016, November). Principles of child safe organisations: What does the evidence say about opportunities - and barriers - to implementation in out-of-home care? Paper presented at the Collaborations in Practice: Sexual Safety in Out-of-Home Care Symposium, Australian and New Zealand Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abuse, Sydney.

Higgins, D. J. (2016, December). Beyond the rhetoric: Measures of success for implementation of public health strategies for a healthy start to the first 1000 days. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia Conference, Canberra.

Higgins, D. J. (2016, December). Child safe organisations: A change in paradigm. Paper presented at the Queensland Family and Child Commission Policy Forum, Brisbane.

Higgins, D. J. (2017, February). Holding the risk: Contemporary work with families. Paper presented at the Leading Practice Conference, Parramatta, NSW.

Higgins, D. J., Kaufman, K., & Erooga, M. (2016, July). How can child welfare and youth-serving organisations keep children safe? Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Hollonds, A. (2016, September). Family Violence and Child Abuse. Presentation at the International Family Law Conference, Singapore.

Hollonds, A. (2016, October). What works for families. Presentation at the UK Early Intervention Foundation, London.

Hollonds, A. (2017, March). What works for families? What do we know about what families do and "what works" to help them to do it better? Presentation to staff at the Australian Government Department of Social Services, Canberra.

Hollonds, A. (2017, June). Evidence and Families Policy: What Works? Presentation at the 10th National Policy Officers' Conference, Canberra.

Horsfall, B. (2016, November). Domestic and Family Violence and Parenting Project: Insights from recent Australian research. Paper presented at the Family Relationship Services National Conference, Canberra.

Horsfall, B. (2017, March). Domestic and Family Violence and Parenting Project: Insights from recent Australian research. Paper presented at the Victorian Government Department of Health and Human Services, Melbourne.

Hunt, G., Bryant, R., & Baxter, J. A. (2016, October). Young people not fully engaged in employment or education: Five years on. Paper presented at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data Conference, Canberra.

Hunter, C. (2016, August). Protecting Australia's Children Research Audit. Paper presented at the Association of Children's Welfare Agencies Conference, Sydney.

Jenkinson, R. (2017, May). Weighing up the odds: Exploring gambling motivations, attitudes, behaviours and harm among young men who are regular participants and viewers of sports that involve exposure to gambling. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Workshop, Melbourne.

Jenkinson, R., De Maio, J., Silbert M., & Edwards, B. (2016, July). Gender differences in early settlement experiences for humanitarian migrants living in Australia. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Jenkinson, R., De Maio, J., Silbert M., & Edwards, B. (2016, November). Gender differences in early settlement experiences for humanitarian migrants living in urban and regional communities around Australia. Paper presented at the National Multicultural Women's Conference, Sydney.

Jessup, K., & Renda, R. (2016, October). Age-sensitive content and methodological solutions in Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Paper presented at the Society of Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Bamberg, Germany. 

Jessup, K., & Renda, R. (2016, October). Factors influencing attrition of parents and children in Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Paper presented at the Society of Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Bamberg, Germany.

Kaspiew, R. (2016, July). Elder abuse: Understanding issues, frameworks and responses. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Kaspiew, R. (2016, July). Improving outcomes for families caught between the child protection and family law system: Key findings of the Department of Health and Human Services' (Victoria) Co-located Child Protection Practitioner initiative. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Kaspiew, R. (2016, July). The role of legislative change in reforming family law: Reflections on two successive waves of reform. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Kaspiew, R. (2016, August). Part VII, family violence and decisions for children. Paper presented at the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, Australian Chapter Annual Conference.

Kapsiew, R. (2016, October). The new normal: The profile of cases in family law and the impacts of trauma on child development. Paper presented at the National ICL Training.

Kaspiew, R. (2017, June). Domestic and Family Violence and Parenting Project. Paper presented at the ANROWS Symposium Child Protection and Domestic Violence: Meeting the challenges of Collaboration, Brisbane.

Kipsaina, C., Thomas, A., Rintoul, A., Jenkinson, R., & de Lacy-Vawdon, C. (2016, December). National Gambling Reporting System (NGRS) Scoping Study Advisory Group Workshop 1. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Workshop, Melbourne.

Kipsaina, C., Thomas, A., Rintoul, A., Jenkinson, R., & de Lacy-Vawdon, C. (2017, February). National Gambling Reporting System (NGRS) Scoping Study Advisory Group Workshop 2. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Workshop, Melbourne.

Lahausse, J., & Higgins, D. J. (2016, July). Children's caregiver and placement household characteristics: A baseline analysis from the Pathways of Care Longitudinal Study. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Moore, S. (2017, May). Outcomes measurement. Paper presented at the Children and Parenting Support Forum, Melbourne.

Qu, L. (2016, November). Cohabiting and married parents who separate: Does this distinction have any relevance for service providers? Paper presented at the Family Relationship Services National Conference, Canberra.

Qu, L., & de Vaus, D. (2016, December). Marital separation for older Australians in new millennium. Paper presented at the Australian Population Association Conference, Sydney.

Qu, L., Moloney, L., & Kaspiew, R. (2016, July). Characteristics of separated parents who remain fearful or in high conflict: Towards better-targeted legal and service responses. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Qu, L., & Weston, R. (2016, July). The characteristics and circumstances of "non-resident" mothers. Poster presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Quadara, A. (2016, July). Sexualisation of children debates in the research literature: Implications for preventing violence against women. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Quadara, A. (2016, October). Consent, sexual assault and alcohol: Unpacking the calculus of risk, prevention and responsibility. Paper presented at the Lifting the Lid Forum, Cairns, Qld.

Quadara, A. (2016, November). The impact of institutional child sexual abuse disclosures on family relationships. Paper presented at the "It's No Secret" Sexual Assault, Sexual Abuse & Domestic Violence National Conference, Bunbury, WA.

Quadara, A. (2017, March). New directions in research on sexual victimisation. Paper presented at the Violence and Aggression Symposium, Deakin University, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A. (2016, October). Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Public Health Policy Review, workshop 1. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Workshop, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A. (2017, March). Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Public Health Policy Review, Workshop 2. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Workshop, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A. (2017, May). Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Public Health Policy Review, workshop 3. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Workshop, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., & Thomas, A. (2016, August). Gambling in suburban Australia. Paper presented at the Victorian Local Governance Association Local Government Working Group on Gambling, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., & Thomas, A. (2016, December). Gambling in suburban Australia. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Prevention Project Forum, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., & Thomas, A. (2017, February). Gambling and Family Violence: Experiences from the GISA study. Paper presented at the Victorian Local Governance Association Forum, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., & Thomas, A. (2017, April). Responsible Gambling Codes of Conduct: Honoured in the breach rather than the observance. Poster presented at the Alberta Gambling Institute Conference, Banff, Canada.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., & Thomas, A. (2017, May). Gambling in suburban Australia: Responsible Gambling Codes of Conduct. Honoured in the breach rather than the observance. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, lunchtime workshop, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A., Deblaquiere, J., Thomas, A., Dickins, M., & Armstrong, A. (2016, July). Gambling in suburban Australia: Findings from a place-based study in two local areas of Melbourne, Australia. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Rintoul, A., & Livingstone, C. (2016, August). Using Haddon's Matrix to conceptualise the prevention and reduction of gambling-related harm. Paper presented at the Nordic Alcohol and Other Drug Researchers Assembly, Helsinki, Finland.

Rioseco, P. (2016, November). Family context of refugee children: Findings from "Building a New Life in Australia" study. Paper presented at the Researchers for Asylum Seekers Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Conference, Melbourne.

Rioseco, P., & De Maio, J. (2016, December). Self-rated health in recently arrived humanitarian migrants. Paper presented at the Australian Population Association Conference, Sydney.

Robinson, E. (2016, July). Supporting evidence-based practice. Paper presented at the Communities for Children Facilitating Partners NSW Conference, Sydney.

Robinson, E. (2016, October). Quality programs, great outcomes. Paper presented at the Children and Parenting Support Forum, Melbourne.

Robinson, E. (2016, November). An update on supporting child and family services to improve evidence-based practice: The Expert Panel Project. Paper presented at the Family and Relationship Services Australia Conference, Canberra.

Robinson, E. (2017, June). Using evidence in practice. Paper presented at the Healthy Attachment Australia New Zealand Conference, Canberra.

Robinson. E. (2017, June). Using evidence to change practice. Paper presented at the Evidence For Impact Symposium, Melbourne.

Robinson, E., & Goldsworthy, K. (2016, July). Nudge and encourage: Advancing the use of evidence-based programs in child and family support services. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Smart, J. (2016, December). Community engagement: Ingredients for collaboration. Paper presented at the Collaborating with Community Symposium, Sydney.

Strazdins, L., Baxter, J. A., & Bessell, S. (2016, August). The transition to parenthood, trends and challenges in family policy in Australia. Paper presented at the seminar Families and Family Life Inside and Outside Europe: Current Trends and Challenges for Parents, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.

Thomas, A. (2016, September). Something to do? The role of local government in reducing social isolation amongst seniors. Paper presented at the Forum for Local Government in Victoria, Melbourne.

Thomas, A. (2016, October). Building the evidence for effective harm reduction: Where is gambling? Paper presented at the APSAD Scientific Alcohol and Drug Conference, Sydney.

Thomas, A. (2016, October). Responsible gambling panel discussion. Paper presented for Responsible Gambling Awareness Week, Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, Melbourne.

Thomas, A., Armstrong, A., & Yu, M. (2016, November). Gambling harm in young adults: The importance of socio-environmental factors. Paper presented at the National Association for Gambling Studies Conference, Cairns, Qld.

Thomas, A., Armstrong, A., Yu, M., Jenkinson, R., & Dickins, M. (2016, July). When is gambling a game? Describing and exploring simulated gambling. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Thomas, A., Yu, M., & Armstrong, A. (2017, February). Gambling harm amongst men and women: Considering the importance of family and friends. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, lunchtime workshop. Melbourne, Australia.

Vassallo, S., Edwards, B., & Forrest, W. (2016, July). What factors protect "at-risk" children from fighting in early adulthood? Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Warren, D. (2016, July). Women's outcomes in retirement. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Warren, D. (2016, July). Low income and poverty dynamics: Implications for children's cognitive and social outcomes. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Warren, D., Baxter, J., & Yu, M. (2017, May). Children's use of media and technology: Evidence from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Paper presented at the ACCM Tots and Tech Conference, Melbourne.

Warren, D., & Edwards, B. (2016, October). Contexts of disadvantage: Implications for children's cognitive and social outcomes. Paper presented at the National Centre for Longitudinal Data Conference, Canberra.

Warren, D., & Edwards, B. (2017, June). Contexts of disadvantage: Implications for cognitive and social outcomes. Paper presented at the ARACY Parenting Engagement Conference, Melbourne.

Warren, D., & Homel, J. (2016, July). Parental influences on adolescents' alcohol use. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Yu, M., & Warren, D. (2016, July). Pubertal status and emotional, school and social functioning among Australian children. Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Appendix D: Consultancies and collaboration 2016/17

Submissions

The Institute prepares submissions to inquiries and responds to requests for consultation from government bodies and community organisations. Such activity is an indication of the Institute's involvement in policy and research processes.

In the reporting period, the Institute made the following submissions:

  • Submission to the Inquiry into the 2016 Census, Commonwealth of Australia Senate Standing Committees on Economics (September 2016)
  • Submission to discussion paper on a National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering in Australia, Commonwealth Government (November 2016)
  • Submission to the Inquiry to the Fairer Paid Parental Leave Bill 2016 (December 2016)
  • Submission to a Victorian Government consultation paper on gaming machine harm minimisation measures (January 2017)
  • A. Thomas appeared at the Senate Standing Committees on Environment and Communications inquiry and report in relation to the Interactive Gambling Amendment (Sports Betting Reform) Bill 2015 (March 2017)
  • Submission to the Parliamentary inquiry into a better family law system to support and protect those affected by family violence (April 2017)
  • Submission to a Regulation Impact Statement (RIS) in relation to a National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering in Australia, Commonwealth Government (June 2017)
Appendix E: Acronyms and abbreviations

Table E1: Acronyms and abbreviations
Acronyms and abbreviations Description
AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board
ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics
ACT Australian Capital Territory
ADF Australian Defence Force
AFM Advance to the Finance Minister
AGD Attorney-General's Department
AGRC Australian Gambling Research Centre
AIFS Australian Institute of Family Studies
AM Member of the Order of Australia
ANAO Australian National Audit Office
ANROWS Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety
ANU Australian National University
APS Australian Public Service
ATP Australian Temperament Project
AWA Australian Workplace Agreement
BNLA Building a New Life in Australia
CAFS Children and Families Secretaries
CALD Culturally and linguistically diverse
CFCA Child Family Community Australia information exchange
Cth Commonwealth
DCB Departmental Capital Budget
DHHS Victorian Government Department of Health and Human Services
DHS Department of Human Services
DoE Department of Education and Training
DSS Department of Social Services
DVA Department of Veterans' Affairs
EL Executive Level
FaCS NSW Department of Family and Community Services
FBT Fringe Benefits Tax
FMO Finance Minister's Order
FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982
GST Goods and Services Tax
IFA Individual flexibility arrangements
IPS Information Publication Scheme
LSAC Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
MOU Memorandum of Understanding
MP Member of Parliament
NSW New South Wales
OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
OPA Official Public Account
PAES Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements
PBS Portfolio Budget Statements
PGPA Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013
PM&C Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
PSPF Protective Security Policy Framework
Qld Queensland
SA South Australia
SES Senior Executive Service
SME Small and medium enterprises
SOETM Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts
SPRC Social Policy Research Centre
Tas. Tasmania
UK United Kingdom
UNSW University of New South Wales
USA United States of America
Vic. Victoria
VRGF Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation
WA Western Australia
Appendix F: List of requirements

The Annual Report is prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit. This index refers to mandatory and suggested reporting items.

Table F1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items
PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement
17AD(g) Letter of transmittal
17AI iii A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report. Mandatory
17AD(h) Aids to access
17AJ(a) v Table of contents. Mandatory
17AJ(b) 105 Alphabetical index. Mandatory
17AJ(c) 96 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory
17AJ(d) 98 List of requirements. Mandatory
17AJ(e) ii Details of contact officer. Mandatory
17AJ(f) ii Entity's website address. Mandatory
17AJ(g) ii Electronic address of report. Mandatory
17AD(a) Review by accountable authority
17AD(a) 2 A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory
17AD(b) Overview of the entity
17AE(1)(a)(i) 10 A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory
17AE(1)(a)(ii) 11 A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory
17AE(1)(a)(iii) 12 A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity. Mandatory
17AE(1)(a)(iv) iv A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. Mandatory
17AE(1)(b) N/A An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio departments Mandatory
17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change. If applicable, Mandatory
17AD(c) Report on the performance of the entity  
  Annual performance statements  
17AD(c)(i); 16F 14 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule. Mandatory
17AD(c)(ii) Report on financial performance  
17AF(1)(a) 28 A discussion and analysis of the entity's financial performance. Mandatory
17AF(1)(b) 29 A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory
17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity's future operation or financial results. If applicable, Mandatory
17AD(d) Management and accountability  
  Corporate governance  
17AG(2)(a) 32 Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems) Mandatory
17AG(2)(b)(i) 32 A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. Mandatory
17AG(2)(b)(ii) 32 A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place. Mandatory
17AG(2)(b)(iii) 32 A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity. Mandatory
17AG(2)(c) 33 An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance. Mandatory
17AG(2)(d) - (e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance. If applicable, Mandatory
  External scrutiny  
17AG(3) 37 Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity's response to the scrutiny. Mandatory
17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity. If applicable, Mandatory
17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman. If applicable, Mandatory
17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. If applicable, Mandatory
  Management of human resources  
17AG(4)(a) 38 An assessment of the entity's effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. Mandatory
17AG(4)(b) 39-41 Statistics on the entity's APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following: 
  • Statistics on staffing classification level;
  • Statistics on full-time employees;
  • Statistics on part-time employees;
  • Statistics on gender;
  • Statistics on staff location;
  • Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.
Mandatory
17AG(4)(c) 41 Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999. Mandatory
17AG(4)(c)(i) 41 Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc. identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c). Mandatory
17AG(4)(c)(ii) 40 The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory
17AG(4)(c)(iii) 39 A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory
17AG(4)(d)(i) 41 Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, Mandatory
17AG(4)(d)(ii) 41 Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. If applicable, Mandatory
17AG(4)(d)(iii) 41 Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. If applicable, Mandatory
17AG(4)(d)(iv) 41 Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, Mandatory
  Assets management  
17AG(5) N/A An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity's activities. If applicable, Mandatory
  Purchasing  
17AG(6) 42 An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Mandatory
  Consultants  
17AG(7)(a) 42 A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). Mandatory
17AG(7)(b) 43 A statement that "During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]". Mandatory
17AG(7)(c) 42 A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged. Mandatory
17AG(7)(d) 43 A statement that "Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website." Mandatory
  Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses  
17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor's premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract. If applicable, Mandatory
  Exempt contracts  
17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters. If applicable, Mandatory
  Small business  
17AG(10)(a) 44 A statement that "[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance's website." Mandatory
17AG(10)(b) 44 An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. Mandatory
17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature - a statement that "[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury's website." If applicable, Mandatory
  Financial statements  
17AD(e) 45 Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory
17AD(f) Other mandatory information  
17AH(1)(a)(i) N/A If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that "During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity's website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance's website." If applicable, Mandatory
17AH(1)(a)(ii) 80 If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. If applicable, Mandatory
17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that "Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity's website]." If applicable, Mandatory
17AH(1)(c) 80 Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. Mandatory
17AH(1)(d) 81 Website reference to where the entity's Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found. Mandatory
17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable, Mandatory
17AH(2) 80 Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

Note: N/A = not applicable

Acknowledgements

Feature image: © istockphoto/monkeybusinessimages

Publication details

Annual Report
Published by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, October 2017
120 pp.

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