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Family Matters No. 47 - June 1997

Parenting Plans - Should they be set in concrete?

Bill Hughes

Abstract

Following separation and the consequent break up of the family unit, there remain many circumstances in which the parents retain a cooperative relationship which enables both to play a continuing role in the care of the children of their marriage. The author presents the Family Law Council's argument that parenting plans were particularly aimed at helping such couples in making their own flexible arrangements and offering them an alternative to court action. They were not envisaged as formal agreements capable of registration in the Family Court. (Journal abstract)

Following separation and the consequent break up of the family unit, there remain many circumstances in which the parents retain a cooperative relationship which enables both to play a continuing role in the care of the children of their marriage. The author presents the Family Law Council's argument that parenting plans were particularly aimed at helping such couples in making their own flexible arrangements and offering them an alternative to court action. They were not envisaged as formal agreements capable of registration in the Family Court. (Journal abstract)

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