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Family Matters No. 61 - April 2002

Fathers' views on family life and paid work

Kelly Hand and Virginia Lewis

Abstract

Do working fathers think they have enough time to spend with their children? In 2001, the Australian Institute of Family Studies conducted research commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services which comprised interviews with 47 Melbourne families about work and family life. As part of this Family and Work: The Family's Perspective project, the Talking to Fathers study explores the responses of 27 fathers from a variety of family types, occupations and income levels. This article focuses on fathers' responses about whether they felt that they spent enough time with their children, the way they like to spend time with their children, and how they seek to balance work and family responsibilities.

Do working fathers think they have enough time to spend with their children? In 2001, the Australian Institute of Family Studies conducted research commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services which comprised interviews with 47 Melbourne families about work and family life. As part of this Family and Work: The Family's Perspective project, the Talking to Fathers study explores the responses of 27 fathers from a variety of family types, occupations and income levels. This article focuses on fathers' responses about whether they felt that they spent enough time with their children, the way they like to spend time with their children, and how they seek to balance work and family responsibilities.

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