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Family Matters No. 67 - May 2004

Child support policy in Australia

Back to basics?
Bruce Smyth

Abstract

Consistent with its legislative responsibility to investigate factors affecting the well being of children and families. The Australian Institute of Family Studies has maintained an interest in the development and evaluation of Australia's Child Support Scheme. This article sets out some of the conceptual challenges that are likely to confront any legislative reform to overhaul the Scheme, as recommended by the recent parliamentary inquiry into child custody arrangements after parental separation, and argues that the values underlying the original establishment of the Scheme should be borne in mind when making recommendations for change.

Consistent with its legislative responsibility to investigate factors affecting the well being of children and families. The Australian Institute of Family Studies has maintained an interest in the development and evaluation of Australia's Child Support Scheme. This article sets out some of the conceptual challenges that are likely to confront any legislative reform to overhaul the Scheme, as recommended by the recent parliamentary inquiry into child custody arrangements after parental separation, and argues that the values underlying the original establishment of the Scheme should be borne in mind when making recommendations for change.

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