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Family Matters No. 67 - May 2004

Children's living arrangements after parental separation

Lixia Qu

Abstract

Most children live with their mothers after parental separation, and little is known about those who live with their fathers. By using data from the study, 'Caring for Children after Separation', undertaken by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, the author investigates changes in the residence arrangements of children. Looking at parents' reports of where children were living at separation and at the time of interview, this article explores the relevance of age and gender of children and the repartnering of parents as factors influencing residence choices.

Most children live with their mothers after parental separation, and little is known about those who live with their fathers. By using data from the study, 'Caring for Children after Separation', undertaken by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, the author investigates changes in the residence arrangements of children. Looking at parents' reports of where children were living at separation and at the time of interview, this article explores the relevance of age and gender of children and the repartnering of parents as factors influencing residence choices.

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