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Family Matters No. 75 - September 2006

The intergenerational effects of forced separation on the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal children and young people

Sven Silburn, Stephen Zubrick, David Lawrence, Francis Mitrou, John De Maio, Eve Blair, Adele Cox, Robin Dalby, Judith Griffin, Glenn Pearson and Colleen Hayward

Abstract

It is now generally accepted that both forced separation and forced relocation have had devastating consequences on Indigenous families in terms of social and cultural dislocation and have impacted on the health and well being of subsequent generations. However, until recently there has been little or no empirical data to scientifically document the nature and extent of these intergenerational effects. In this paper, the authors seek to address this gap in the research.

It is now generally accepted that both forced separation and forced relocation have had devastating consequences on Indigenous families in terms of social and cultural dislocation and have impacted on the health and well being of subsequent generations. However, until recently there has been little or no empirical data to scientifically document the nature and extent of these intergenerational effects. In this paper, the authors seek to address this gap in the research.

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