Family-related life events

Insights from two Australian longitudinal studies
Research Report No. 22 – December 2012

Appendix C. Supplementary figures, HILDA analyses

Figures C1 to C8 show proportions of men and women indicating high wellbeing or low wellbeing as defined for each measure:

  • satisfaction with life general - ratings of 8 to 10 are considered as being highly satisfied with life;C1
  • sense of social isolation - scores ranging from 6 to 10 are considered as feeling isolated;
  • sense of social connection - scores ranging from 6 to 10 are considered as feeling socially connected; and
  • overall wellbeing - scores in the top quartile (i.e., the 25% with the highest scores) were classified as having high overall wellbeing.

Figure C1: Proportions of men highly satisfied with life overall in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C1: Proportions of men highly satisfied with life overall in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: High satisfaction refers to ratings of 8–10 on a scale of 0–10.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C2: Proportions of women highly satisfied with life overall in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C2: Proportions of women highly satisfied with life overall in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: High satisfaction refers to ratings of 8–10 on a scale of 0–10.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C3: Proportions of men feeling isolated in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C3: Proportions of men feeling isolated in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: Isolation refers to scores of 6–10 on a scale of 0–10.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C4: Proportions of women feeling isolated in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months as reported in Wave 10

Figure C4: Proportions of women feeling isolated in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months as reported in Wave 10"

Note: Isolation refers to scores 6–10 on a scale of 0–10.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C5: Proportions of men feeling connected with others in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C5: Proportions of men feeling connected with others in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: Feeling connected here refers to scores of 6–10 on a scale of 0–10.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C6: Proportions of women feeling connected with others in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C6: Proportions of women feeling connected with others in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: Feeling connected here refers to scores of 6–10 on a scale of 0–10.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C7: Proportions of men with high overall wellbeing in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C7: Proportions of men with high overall wellbeing in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: High wellbeing is defined as the top quartile of the overall wellbeing score.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Figure C8: Proportions of women with high overall wellbeing in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Figure C8: Proportions of women with high overall wellbeing in Waves 9 and 10, by whether experienced life events in the preceding 12 months, as reported in Wave 10

Note: High wellbeing is defined as the top quartile of the overall wellbeing score.

Source: HILDA 2009 & 2010

Footnote

C1 Cummins (2003) found that ratings of overall life satisfaction vary within a narrow range of positive values. In Western countries, mean ratings of population estimates were around 75 on a scale from 0 to 100. In HILDA Waves 9 and 10, the mean scores of satisfaction with life overall were 7.84 (taken separately).