Publications

AIFS produces a number of publications relating to our research throughout the year. These include research papers and reports, facts sheets, commissioned reports and submissions. We also publish our peer-reviewed journal Family Matters twice a year and prepared reports for Closing the Gap.

All publications are also listed in our library catalogue.

See also publications from  Growing Up in Australia .

Supported playgroups for parents and children: The evidence for their benefits

Family Matters No. 99, 2017

Supported playgroups have been operating for many years in Australia, despite the absence of strong empirical evidence for their effectiveness in supporting vulnerable families. This article assesses the evidence on the benefits of supported playgroups for parents and children and the factors important to their operation. It also considers their role as a 'soft entry point' to other services, and whether - and how - they assist families to transition out of the playgroup.

The Expert Panel Project

Family Matters No. 99, 2017

In 2014, the Australian Government Department of Social Services commissioned the establishment of a panel of experts to help service providers to deliver evidence-based programs and practices in the family support sector - the Expert Panel Project. Now that the Project is half-way through its 5-year term, this article reviews progress to date and some of the benefits and challenges of the process so far. Particular reference is made to programs under the Government’s Communities for Children Facilitating Partners initiative.

Practitioners on evidence

Sam Morley
Family Matters No. 99, 2017

These four short practitioner profiles explore how evidence is being generated and used by community service organisations in the child and family welfare sector. These experts (from metropolitan and regional organisations around Australia) reiterate how an evidence base is essential to a detailed understanding of their clients’ needs and to choosing the right interventions. Their insights are important to the work of policy-makers and researchers.

Conference Keynote. Research to recommendations

Justice Jennifer Coate
Family Matters No. 99, 2017

In this article, Commissioner and Justice Jennifer Coate describes the aims and work of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, including its terms of reference, approaches to information gathering, research program, the issue of disclosure, and the Royal Commission's goal to produce recommendations that are actually implementable. Already, the Royal Commission's research has provided a strong evidence base for reform.

Conference Keynote. What can early interventions really achieve, and how will we know?

John Lynch
Family Matters No. 99, 2017

In this article, based on his keynote address given at the 16th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Professor John Lynch considers evidence-based policy-making from the perspective of an epidemiologist. Professor Lynch describes recent evaluations of several early childhood programs from Australia and overseas, and concludes with recommendations for getting "good-enough" evidence.

Conference Keynote. Two-generation programs:: Can 1 + 1 be more than 2?

Greg Duncan
Family Matters No. 99, 2017

Two-generation programs provide coordinated services to both parents and children - for example, early childhood education complemented with a parenting skills program. In this article, based on his keynote address given at the 16th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Distinguished Professor Greg Duncan looks at the potential of two-generation programs to benefit families - such as by closing the school achievement gap between children of high and low socio-economic status or reducing 'toxic stress' in the home.

"Working out what works for families": Evidence and the Australian child and family service system

Family Matters No. 99, 2017

Overviews the increasing policy and practice focus on the need to better understand the effects of social services on families. Hand highlights how governments across Australia are increasingly making data collection and evaluation part of their conditions for funding programs and individual services. The article also discusses the contested nature of "evidence" and future directions for program evaluation.

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