You are in an archived section of the AIFS website. Archived publications may be of interest for historical reasons. Because of their age, they may not reflect current research data or AIFS' current research methodologies.

Family Matters No. 51 - September 1998

A new model for 'Corporate Philanthropy'

Ron Burke

Abstract

It is the author's thesis that we are at one of those rare moments in history when a conjunction of influences and events provides nations such as Australia with the need and the opportunity to address a range of issues of fundamental importance to their citizens. The major participants in this process should be our core institutions: governments, corporations, and major academic, religious, cultural and community organisations. The author argues the case for diverse opinion - but united effort - among these institutions in addressing the fundamental issues before our nation. Following a brief overview of global trends, the author considers the potential for modern corporations to be more actively engaged in addressing public policy and community issues, arguing that no progress will be made without understanding and taking into account the major changes underway in the corporate sector. In essence, he argues, there is a need to turn philanthropy from what is often an extension of social welfarism into more cogent, focused activity that is designed to bring about real social change.

It is the author's thesis that we are at one of those rare moments in history when a conjunction of influences and events provides nations such as Australia with the need and the opportunity to address a range of issues of fundamental importance to their citizens. The major participants in this process should be our core institutions: governments, corporations, and major academic, religious, cultural and community organisations. The author argues the case for diverse opinion - but united effort - among these institutions in addressing the fundamental issues before our nation. Following a brief overview of global trends, the author considers the potential for modern corporations to be more actively engaged in addressing public policy and community issues, arguing that no progress will be made without understanding and taking into account the major changes underway in the corporate sector. In essence, he argues, there is a need to turn philanthropy from what is often an extension of social welfarism into more cogent, focused activity that is designed to bring about real social change.

You are in an archived section of the Australian Institute of Family Studies website. Articles in this issue of Family Matters are only available as PDF documents and do not meet the latest web accessibility standards. If you are unable to access any of the articles in this issue of Family Matters please contact us and we will endeavour to provide the article/s you need in a format that you can use.